Science & Technology

The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Sat March 22, 2014

Latest Leak: NSA Burrowed Into Chinese Telecom Giant's Servers

The National Security Agency has in recent years "pried its way into the servers" of Huawei, a Chinese telecommunications company that the spy agency has long suspected could work with the Chinese military to steal secrets from American firms and the U.S. government, The New York Times reported Saturday.

Read more
Science
1:03 pm
Sat March 22, 2014

Why The Exxon Valdez Spill Was A Eureka Moment For Science

An oiled murre passes the darkened shoreline near Prince William Sound, Alaska, less than a month after the March 1989 spill.
Erik Hill Anchorage Daily News/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 10:36 am

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

Twenty-five years of research following the Exxon Valdez disaster has led to some startling conclusions about the persistent effects of spilled oil.

Read more
All Tech Considered
12:45 pm
Sat March 22, 2014

Tech Week: Robots, Turkish Twitter And A Frustrated Zuckerberg

A BigDog robot at Boston Dynamics in 2010.
Suzanne Kreiter Boston Globe via Getty Images

Happy weekend! If you've missed our tech coverage and the larger conversation at the intersection of technology and culture this week, here's your look back. ICYMI is what we reported on NPR, The Big Conversation includes news from all sorts of places, and Curiosities are important or fun links we think you should check out.

What was on your radar? What should we look out for next week? Tell us in the comment section below. We do read them, you know.

Read more
Digital Life
6:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Breaking News: Robot Reports An Earthquake

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This week, an earthquake gave an algorithm its big break in journalism. The 4.4 earthquake rumbled the ground of Southern California on Monday morning, and within three minutes, Quakebot generated an article about it for the Los Angeles Times. And Quakebot probably didn't charge overtime. Ken Schwencke joins us now. He is the journalist and programmer who designed Quakebot. Mr. Schwencke, thanks so much for being with us.

KEN SCHWENCKE: Thank you.

SIMON: So, the article is essentially prewritten or I'm trying to figure this out.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
4:03 am
Sat March 22, 2014

I Can't Believe What I'm Seeing: A Springtime (Froggy) Miracle

NOVA scienceNOW

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:19 am

Two weeks ago this animal was frozen solid. If you found one in the woods, packed in the topsoil, hiding under a leaf, you could pull it from the ground and it would feel like an ashtray. You could bang it (lightly) on a table — it would go, "Konk!" like a rock. It doesn't seem to be breathing. It reacts to nothing. It's so dead. Or seems to be. And then, this (I want to call it a miracle) happens ...

Read more
The Two-Way
6:57 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Satellites' Scope And The Search For A Plane

Satellite imagery provided to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority of objects that may be possible debris of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.
Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 7:12 pm

The search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is now concentrated in the southern Indian Ocean, with satellite clues bringing aircraft and ships closer to objects that could be the debris from the missing airliner.

But as NPR's Robert Siegel said on All Things Considered Friday, "This is not like finding a needle in a haystack. In this case, the haystack is vast and the needle could be moving."

Read more
News
3:24 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Even Turkey's President Evades Its New Twitter Ban

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 5:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Read more
Technology
3:24 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

The All But Impossible Task Of Finding Debris In An Ocean

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 5:22 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Another day of searching, another day of frustration in the effort to find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Planes searching the southern Indian Ocean for possible aircraft debris have found nothing. They're looking for two large floating objects detected by satellite about 1,500 miles off the southwest coast of Australia.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:57 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

So You Want To Evade Your Country's Twitter Ban? A Workaround

A woman looks at her smartphone as she walks by a banner of Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, in Istanbul on March 21. On Thursday, Turkish court orders banned Internet users from accessing Twitter, but the social media company posted instructions on how to tweet from a phone.
Ozan Kose AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 9:41 pm

The Turkish prime minister vowed to "eradicate" Twitter in a speech on Thursday, likely because he's been treated unkindly on there, and he has an election to win, people! Hours later, the social media platform went dark for some Turkish users, The Guardian reports.

Read more
The Salt
1:21 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

How Your Love Of Burgers May Be Helping To Drive Wildlife Extinct

Rancher Denny Johnson looks over his cattle in Joseph, Ore., in 2011. Conservationists say ranchers raising beef cattle are responsible for the decline of some wildlife.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 1:57 pm

Many animal lovers have made peace with their decision to eat meat.

But the Center for Biological Diversity has a new campaign that hopes to convince them that a hamburger habit does wildlife a disservice.

"We need to see a drastic reduction in meat consumption to protect land, water and wildlife," Stephanie Feldstein, population and sustainability director for the Center for Biological Diversity, tells The Salt.

Read more

Pages