Science & Technology

Science and technology news

If you walk around your city or town and keep your eye to the ground, you'll start noticing round metal lids embedded in the street.

That means underneath is an important utility, usually marked "water" or "sewer." But some of the manholes carry the relic logo of a bell; these mark the backbone of America's telecommunications.

During the Olympics we will hear a lot about the winners. But the reality is most athletes at the games come home without a medal. Today we explore what losing does to athletes, fans and anyone who casts a vote for president.

Listen to this week's episode to hear the story of judo star Jimmy Pedro, and how he dealt with a crushing defeat in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney.

Daniel Pink also joins Shankar for a Stopwatch Science competition on all the unintended consequences of losing.

Stopwatch Science

High blood pressure, once considered a scourge of wealthy nations, is now even more common in low- and middle-income countries, according to an analysis in the journal Circulation.

Globally, more than 30 percent of the population suffered from high blood pressure, otherwise known as hypertension, in 2010. That represents a notable increase over the span of a decade, driven by a dramatic rise of hypertension in less wealthy nations, according to the new study.

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ARWEN'S SONG")

PETER HOLLENS: (Singing) Time and tide will sweep all away.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Congress is in the midst of a review of the copyright laws to make sure they're up to date. Some of the recording industry's biggest stars, among them Taylor Swift, Katy Perry and Paul McCartney, recently signed a letter urging lawmakers to make reforms.

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