St. Philip's College

Joey Palacios / TPR News

The early college high school movement is growing exponentially in Texas. There are more than 60 in the state and five are opening this fall in San Antonio alone. One of them is the St. Philip’s early college high school with SAISD.

Outside the Bowden Building in the middle of the St. Philips campus, teachers dressed in bright-orange t-shirts greet the incoming freshmen, who are wearing either white or blue. It’s the first day of class for the new school and the students are being welcomed by SAISD Superintendent Sylvester Perez.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Beginning this fall, St. Philip’s College will play host to SAISD students in the district’s second early college high school.

St. Philip’s College has 10,000 students, but 100 high school freshmen will call the campus home in August. SAISD has formally approved an agreement with the Alamo Colleges to open a school on campus where, by graduation, students will earn 60 hours of college credit or even an associates degree.

Leslie Price, a spokeswoman for SAISD, said students will take their normal educational curriculum but also take classes for college credit.

Frederick Gonzales / City of San Antonio Photographer

The Pre-K 4 SA board has voted to initiate a six-month study on a facility at St. Philip’s College.

The purpose of the study will be to find out how the facility could assist San Antonio’s new education initiative in providing educational benefits to the city’s four-year-old population.

"The St. Philips site is not really a fifth site because the footprint is much smaller," said Elaine Mendoza, the board’s chairperson.

Chris Eudaily / TPR

The Source: The incredible story of St. Philips College is now documented in a new book, and believe it or not, pool season is just around the corner and the parks department is already recruiting lifeguards.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Thousands of people crowded the parking lot of Cowboys Dancehall this morning for the 35th annual Cowboy Breakfast in what has become a San Antonio Rodeo tradition. Although people show up for the free food, one local college benefits from the remaining sponsorship money

Roughly 35,000 people turned out for this year’s breakfast, and the unseasonably warm 60 degree weather and overcast skies only helped attendance.

Taking in the music, Brenda Duarte was waiting in line for food and said this is her third year attending with family.