Standardized Testing

If you've followed education in the news or at the book store in the past couple of years, chances are you've heard of "grit." It's often defined as the ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal.

Joey Palacios / TPR News

AUSTIN — Republican Gov. Greg Abbott has signed a bill that would allow Texas high school students to fail two high-stakes exams and still graduate. It is effective immediately.

Abbott said Monday that the state “must protect” students from what he called evolving testing standards. “While it is critical that the state appropriately holds public schools and districts accountable for delivering the best possible education, we must protect Texas students from being penalized as a result of evolving testing standards,” he said in a statement. 

About 28,000 students in the class of 2015 still must pass one or more of the five state exams in U.S. history, biology, algebra I, English I and English II required to graduate. Of those who need to retake exams, about half must retake more than one.

Ryan E. Poppe

A bill to create graduation panels that would approve high school seniors for graduation, even if they failed some of the state’s end-of-course exams, has been approved by lawmakers in the Senate.

The bill by Amarillo Republican Sen. Kel Seliger, if passed by the House and then signed into law, would exempt seniors from having to pass all five standardized tests, known in Texas as the STAAR exams. Seliger said too many seniors were failing these exams, yet still had a great grade point average.

Flickr user biologycorner (Shannan Muskopf) / cc

AUSTIN — The Texas Senate has approved allowing thousands of high school seniors to graduate this year despite failing one of the standardized exams needed to earn a diploma.

Amarillo Republican Sen. Kel Seliger’s bill offers an alternative graduation plan to an estimated 28,000 class of 2015 seniors who failed to pass one of five required statewide exams in algebra I, biology, English I and II and U.S. history.

Flickr user biologycorner (Shannan Muskopf) / cc

Common Core standards were once thought to be the future of education in America, endorsed by 45 states.  

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