SXSW

The eyes of the pop music world are on Austin, Texas this week. Thousands of bands and fans have descended upon the city for the South by Southwest music festival. Austin is also home to its own music scene year-round — and one of its more unusual groups is tapping into a sound that has nothing to do with indie rock or hip-hop. They're called Riyaaz Qawwali.

This story comes from Texas Standard.

A documentary at SXSW – “Kingdom of Shadows” – forces us to look at the ongoing violence south of the Texas-Mexico border.

The film is told through three people – a Mexican nun working to find answers about tens of thousands of disappearances, a U.S. drug enforcement agent and a former Texas drug smuggler. Bernardo Ruiz directed the film.

On Saturday night, musicians and friends of the late Doug Sahm will gather to honor his music and his life, showcased in Joe Nick Patoski’s documentary about the San Antonio-born music icon. TPR’s Jack Morgan spoke to the director about his story of Sahm.

It wasn’t just any 11-year-old who could get on stage with Hank Williams Sr. and that, at what was once one of Austin’s best-known music venues and home to the stars — the Skyline Club. But in December 1952, at the age of 11 and a month or more so, “Little” Doug Sahm did.

This Week On Fronteras:

-- The families and classmates of 43 missing Mexican college students traveled across the U.S. to raise awareness for their situation.

-- A movement is underway to prevent suicides by freeing immigrant mothers and their children from detention centers.

-- From New Mexico, here’s some stereotype defying information about gun violence.

-- The best bilingual teacher in the U.S. hails from Dallas.

-- A talk with the directors of the new border documentary, Western.

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