TCEQ

AARON SCHRANK/TPR

Eduardo Davila moved his wife and kids from Laredo 20 miles east to a colonia called Ranchitos Los Centenarios because he thought the fresh air would be good for their asthma.

“After two years, the asthma had disappeared completely because the air is pure here,” says Davila, speaking in Spanish. “We want this unpolluted environment to continue to exist.”

Earthworks / http://bit.ly/1nsFH8Q / CC

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has frozen nearly $200,000 slotted for air improvement programs at the Alamo Area Council of Governments (AACOG) for publicly posting a study the state's environmental regulator had funded without TCEQ review.

With the city teetering on the precipice of non-attainment with the Clean Air Act -- and the threat of additional mandatory regulations on cars, trucks and ozone producers -- why is the funding being frozen now? 

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Investigators are looking into a weekend fuel spill that shut down paddling trails on the San Antonio River. Oil booms were still in place along the Mission Reach Monday, but parts of the river closed Saturday were open again.

The good thing is the spill was small and no wildlife were harmed, but this is the second spill at the Calumet refinery, which produces ultra-low sulfur diesel, naptha, specialty solvents, vacuum gas and jet fuel, the product that spilled on the ground and into a San Antonio River tributary late Friday evening.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

 The Board of Directors for the Lower Colorado River Authority has approved the next phase of a downstream reservoir that will capture some of the water heading to Matagorda Bay.

This week, the LCRA board approved spending $17 million that will go toward finalizing the design of the reservoir in Wharton County.

The LCRA’s Clara Tuma said the reservoir in the lower basin will provide fresh water to the Gulf Coast bays, as well as Texas rice farmers on the coastal plains.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Commissioners with the Texas Commissioner on Environmental Quality spent nearly six hours hearing testimony from those that would be affected by a request from the Lower Colorado River Authority to stop the flow of water coming from the Highland Lakes.

A crowd of about 250 farmers, water planners and state and local officials shared their thoughts with TCEQ about a request from the LCRA to stop the flow of water from the Highland Lakes unless the lakes had a combined storage of 1.1 million acre feet -- more than half full. 

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