technology

File Photo | Ryan Loyd | TPR News

A $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor is making it a little easier for San Antonio area residents to learn how to code.

After another round of holidays, it's safe to assume, a lot of children have been diving into media more than usual. They may have received new electronic toys and gadgets or downloaded new apps and games. Managing all that bleeping and buzzing activity causes anxiety in many parents. Here's a roundup of some of the latest research, combined with some of our previous reporting, to help guide your decision-making around family screen use.

1. Globally, tech brings young people opportunity as well as risk

If you're reading this through some kind of Bluetooth or Wi-Fi gadget, here's an interesting fact: Some ideas behind that technology can be traced back to a famous actress from the 1930s. Her name was Hedy Lamarr.

People who are growing up with smartphones are having less sex and drinking less alcohol than previous generations, some research indicates. Other studies also show this generation is more depressed, lonelier, more isolated and getting less sleep.

Psychologist Jean M. Twenge says these young consumers, a group she calls iGen, is “on the brink of a mental-health crisis.”

Courtesy of Dauber Applications

Dauber Applications is a company trying to reinvent how one part of the construction industry works: dump trucks. 

Imagine you are a foreman, and you have lined up work for the next day with a team of guys you are paying $500 an hour to load trucks. 

"The scariest, gut-wrenching part is to not have a truck ready at that time," says Dauber CEO Brian Jones. "Right now the way you try to solve that is you call the trucking company and beg, plead, yell and do other unpleasant things to find out where is your truck."

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