Technology & Entrepreneurship

Paul Flahive | Texas Public Radio

Alice Asevedo works for Edgewood Independent School District. Laura Johansen home schools an elementary-aged child.

Both women are blown away by this training on Augmented-Reality books. AR books use smartphones or tablets to add a layer of content on traditional books.

Over their audible gasps, laughs and exclamations, there is a palpable excitement over how they can use these books.

"It's the Earth," says Johansen, "It's the whole Earth," she says staring at a three-dimensional model through an ipad. 

"Oh my God," says Asevedo laughing.

Around 100 people attended a presentation Monday night on how a nonprofit will reshape a 108-year-old power plant on the banks of the San Antonio river. The meeting, which took place at Freetail Brewery on South Presa, was filled with neighbors of the plant eager to see the project come to fruition.

The Mission Road power plant is less than a mile away from the meeting, adjacent to Roosevelt Park.

CPS Energy gave the power plant to the nonprofit EPIcenter earlier this year with the understanding that it would be converted into a hub of innovation in green energy. 

Ilna Colemere holds an iPad over a children's nonfiction book about the solar system. 

"So we're gonna access the camera and you hold it over and eventually" Colemere trails off while maneuvering the iPad over the page.

As we watch, suddenly the music fades up from the iPad, and a three-dimensional sun rises from the two-dimensional book with the planets quickly orbiting it. 

This is augmented reality. Using a smartphone or iPad and an app from the book's publisher, you can see a wealth of unseen content, self-narrating books, or ones with 3D models. 

After months of development, San Antonio's VIA Metropolitan Transit released its new mobile app for smartphones today. It's called goMobile and they hope it will draw new riders and help existing ones.

There is an element of outreach for the new goMobile app. San Antonio is one of the most economically segregated cities in the country, and many of VIA's riders are low income. 

VIA Vice President of Technology Steve Young says that their ridership is increasingly connected though.

It's loud in the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. All weekend, thousands of teachers have been streaming in for the annual International Society for Technology in Education conference. They expect more than 15,000 educators over the multi-day event. 

Since early Sunday morning, companies have been building out their rooms, or building up their booths on the convention center floor.

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