Texas

From Texas Standard:

Recent polls suggest the majority of Americans agree with the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling legalizing same-sex marriage, but opposition to same-sex marriage remains prevalent in southern states like Texas and Louisiana.

Just this week, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said that county clerks don’t need to issue marriage licenses if doing so goes against their faith. Paxton and other opponents of same-sex marriage argue that the government shouldn’t be allowed to interfere with how someone practices their faith.

Houston is the fourth largest city in the country and yet many Americans don’t know what goes on in this Texas city. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson discusses a range of news and issues related to Houston with three of the city’s journalists: Craig Cohen, host and executive producer of Houston Matters on Houston Public Media; Aurora Losada, editor of the Houston Chronicle’s La Voz de Houston; and Shelley Kofler, news director of Texas Public Radio.

Flickr user Adam Fagen (afagen) / cc

Before the end of the month the U.S. Supreme Court will make several ruling that will directly impact Texas – one could upend the Fair Housing Act, another could make same sex marriage legal and another could basically end the Affordable Care Act in Texas by ruling that the Federal government can’t provide health insurance subsidies to states that didn’t set up their own ACA exchanges.

On Thursday the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision on Walker v. The Texas Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. In a five-to-four ruling the high court found that the Texas state government can reject the Confederate Veterans specialty license plate. The court ruled that the plates were a form of government speech and rejecting the confederate plate was within the state’s freedom of speech.

On Friday The Obama administration announced plans to tighten fuel-economy standards for heavy trucks, buses and vans.

That’s the transportation sector that contributes a quarter of the greenhouse-gas pollution emitted by U.S. vehicles each year.

The proposed regulations would require truck manufacturers to dramatically improve engine efficiency over the next 12 years.

It’s an effort to cut down on fuel consumption and emissions blamed for global warming.

The federal government is also fighting climate change with incentives for electric vehicles.

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