Texas Democratic Party

Gage Skidmore http://bit.ly/2H9u6fj / Wikimedia Commons

Julian Castro, former San Antonio mayor and secretary of Housing and Urban Development for the Obama Administration, says he is interested in a 2020 presidential run. But Castro, who is speaking this week in the early presidential primary state of New Hampshire, said he won't announce his official decision later this year.


Office of Congressman Blake Farenthold

Updated at 5:15 p.m. with the Texas Democratic Party dropping its lawsuit. Updates throughout.

The Texas Democratic Party dropped its lawsuit against the Republican Party of Texas and the Secretary of State's office after a U.S. district judge in Austin denied the party's request for a temporary restraining order to keep the state from submitting a final list of 2018 primary candidates, minus embattled Congressman Blake Farenthold. 

 

 

 

From Texas Standard:

The last time a Democrat won statewide office in Texas, grunge rock topped the music charts. The state has been solidly red ever since Republican George W. Bush took over from Democrat Ann Richards in the Governor's mansion. That was more than 20 years ago.

From Texas Standard.

Something happened last night that hasn’t happened in 25 years: The state with "Heart of Dixie" stamped on its license plate elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. The question is whether Doug Jones’ victory in Alabama is an anomaly or a turning point. His opponent, Roy Moore, was a flawed and controversial candidate, but with a Democratic victory, and the weakness of President Donald Trump among some moderately conservative Republicans, it’s possible to envision Democrats making more gains, even in bright red Texas. 

In deep-red Texas, Republicans will have to fight for every seat in Congress during next year's midterm elections. For the first time in 25 years, Democrats are running in all of Texas' 36 congressional districts, according to documents filed with the Texas Secretary of State's office.

Those filings set a record for the number of Democratic challengers in an era of Republican dominance, says Mark Jones, political science fellow at Rice University's Baker Institute. It is a departure from 2016, he says, when eight Republican-held congressional seats went uncontested by Democrats.

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