Texas General Land Office

Stephen F. Austin / H.S. Tanner/ Texas General Land Office

The Texas General Land Office has received an exceptionally rare Stephen F. Austin map of Texas, and was donated by Thomas B. and Marsha Brown Taylor of Seabrook.

 

Austin’s map shows the eastern two thirds of Texas in 1830. The map is from the last known printing in 1848. No other copy of this map is known to exist.

Texas General Land Office

A question about Texas history has been solved thanks to new, rare maps that The Texas General Land Office now has on display.  The maps change what we know about the Republic of Texas.

The Texas General Land Office has a hefty collection of about 45,000 different maps, but they just acquired five rare ones.

Texas Public Radio

  The Alamo is getting a facelift. The Texas Legislature approved $5 million for upgrading bathrooms so they are ADA compliant, structural repairs, preservation work, and adding fiber optics.

Preservation and structural work began Monday on the aging Alamo. Visitors will see scaffolding for the next few months, but the Alamo is open to the public.   

Texas General Land Office spokeswoman Brittany Eck says some of the work addresses safety concerns at the Alamo Research Center.

George P. Bush Headlines Red Carpet Alamo Event

May 19, 2015
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / The Texas Tribune

SAN ANTONIO — Blazing guns, tough talk, cowboys riding into the sunset — the Monday night premiere of Texas Rising at a red carpet Alamo event was vintage Texas with a bit of Hollywood flair. 

A Lone Star-studded audience including Land Commissioner George P. Bush and Cecilia Abbott, the first lady of Texas, got a sneak preview of the new miniseries about the Texas Revolution and the rise of the Texas Rangers. (Gov. Greg Abbott reportedly got hung up in Austin.) 

“It’s one thing to play a hero in a movie. It’s quite another to be a hero in real life,” said Bill Paxton, who plays his ancestor Sam Houston in the series. 

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

There was a flurry of social media posts on Friday by people concerned that their favorite beer was losing its popular logo. But a lawsuit settled this week means that Alamo Beer gets to keep the famous facade on its label.

On the surface, it seems like a complicated legal entanglement, but it really boils down to one simple statement from the General Land Office: “Alamo Brewing Company is the first commercial recipient of an official license to use the Alamo mark, for which they paid a substantial licensing fee.”

Alamo Beer CEO Eugene Simor says it’s been almost a year since his company filed a lawsuit to get another company, the Texian Brewing Company, to stop using the Alamo on its beer labels.

Simor says three days after his filing, the Texas General Land Office took notice and filed as an intervenor.

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