Texas History

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Although writer Carol Hoff was born in Tucson in 1900 and spent her first eight years outside of Texas, she was a true Texan. Her great-grandparents came to Texas as pioneers in 1834, settling in what eventually was the town of Yorktown, the important mid-point along the immigration and trade route from the ill-fated port of Indianola to San Antonio.


©Betsy Newman Photography / Courtesy of Fiesta® San Antonio Commission

San Antonio's largest citywide celebration, Fiesta, has come and gone. However, there’s one more Fiesta story to tell — and it’s one you don’t hear that often: Quite a few San Antonians don't actually like Fiesta, or at very least, they’re conflicted about it.

From Texas Standard.

Many of us have a cabinet or a closet at home with a stack of homemade VHS tapes – or those little tapes that went into newer-model camcorders – or maybe even Super 8s on little plastic reels. What’s on them may be personally worth keeping. But in the age of Blu-ray and digital files, will you ever watch them again?

Wikimedia Commons | http://bit.ly/2pzT2Vp

On this episode of Texas Matters, we look at:

  • The economy of Texas cattle drives. 
  • As San Antonio celebrates its tricentennial, we at two stories, beginning with a look at the art of 1718 (10:00).
  • Then, as the Alamo City celebrates its 300th birthday, there will more than a little tequila used in the celebration. Here's the story behind that smooth and firey inebriant and its tie to San Antonio (19:45).


Norma Martinez / Texas Public Radio

 

Everett Fly is an award-winning San Antonio architect and landscape architect. He is a 2014 National Humanities Medalist, honored by the White House for preserving the integrity of African-American places and landmarks.  

Fly has played an important role in unveiling the hidden African-American history of San Antonio. The east side of the city is known for being predominantly African-American, while the west side is predominantly Hispanic.


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