Texas History

Texas State Archive

This is part two of a five-part series broadcasting on Texas Standard and Texas Public Radio. The series tells the strange story of W. Lee O'Daniel, who in 1938 went from being a flour salesman on the radio to Governor of Texas and then U.S. Senator.  O'Daniel is considered one of the most amazing politicians in Texas history who accomplished virtually nothing.

This is part one of a five-part series broadcasting on Texas Standard. The series tells the strange story of W. Lee O'Daniel who in 1938 went from being a flour salesman on the radio to Governor of Texas and then U.S. Senator.  O'Daniel is considered one of the most amazing politicians in Texas history who accomplished virtually nothing.

In the 1930s every weekday at 12:30 in the afternoon there was one radio program that dominated the airwaves across Texas. W. Lee “Pass The Biscuits Pappy” O'Daniel and his Hillbilly Boys were on the air and selling flour.

Laura Jesse

In the 17th and 18th centuries the Spanish sought to extend their colonies by settling in what is now Bexar County.  An exhibit opening this week in San Antonio’s former Federal Reserve Building helps tell the story of how the Spanish first came to the area.

The notion of a “serial killer” hadn’t been thought up yet in 1885. But that year in Austin, there was one on the loose. It’s one of the greatest unsolved mass murders in Texas history – and except for enthusiasts of the bizarre – it's been all but forgotten.

According to legend -- and a Texas historical marker -- early in the morning on April 17, 1897, something strange happened in the small town of Aurora, about 30 miles northwest of Fort Worth.

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