Texas History

The Southern Poverty Law Center ranks Texas as third in the nation for the most hate group. The state has up to 55 hate groups amid a two-year surge in membership in the so called Alt-right organizations.

Stephen F. Austin / H.S. Tanner/ Texas General Land Office

The Texas General Land Office has received an exceptionally rare Stephen F. Austin map of Texas, and was donated by Thomas B. and Marsha Brown Taylor of Seabrook.

 

Austin’s map shows the eastern two thirds of Texas in 1830. The map is from the last known printing in 1848. No other copy of this map is known to exist.

It was 80 years ago that Texas saw the deadliest school disaster in American history; the explosion at the London Junior-Senior High School, March 18, 1937.  The estimated death toll is about 300 – almost all of them children.

New London, which is in Rusk county in East Texas – and at the time was a boon town because of oil and natural gas. This made New London the richest school district in Texas – but despite that wealth - three months earlier the school board voted to cancel the contract with the United Gas Company to save $300 a month.

Texas history is rich with drama, action and bigger than life characters. And there are many significant events that could have gone either way – and greatly changed the Texas  that we know today.

Wouldn’t it be fascinating to let your imagination explore those pivotal moments? To wonder what really happened, what was said, who shot first, and how did justice prevail, or not?

On Oct. 2, 1835, a small group of rebellious colonists in what is now South Texas defied Mexican rule with the memorable battle cry: "Come and take it!" The dare referred to a small brass cannon, but it became a declaration of Texas' independence and grit as famous as "Remember the Alamo." Today, you can see a twist of the historic slogan on the Come and Wash It Laundromat and Come and Style It beauty salon, both in the town of Gonzales.

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