Texas

From Texas Standard:

Dallas and bankruptcy are two words you normally wouldn’t find in the same sentence. After all, Texas is practically recession-proof and Dallas has one of the fastest-growing economies among large cities in the U.S.

David Martin Davies

The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos canyon lands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural.

Texas has never seen an early voting surge like this before. Driven by the acrimonious contest between presidential candidates Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, voting lines have been long ever since early voting kicked off on October 24th.

With 38 electoral votes, second only to California, keeping Texas a red state is critical to Republican plans  of retaking the White House. This is true for this Tuesday and into the future.

The night of December 6th 1991 – Four girls – ages 17, 17, 15 and 13 were working and hanging out at a “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt!” store in Austin.

Eliza Thomas, Amy Ayers and sister Jennifer and Sarah Harbison were forced to strip, they were tied up, they were murdered – the shop was set on fire and the case is unsolved.

25 years after that night – it’s still a deep dark mystery.

“Who Killed These Girls? Cold Case: The Yogurt Shop Murders” explores in rich detail the kills and the flawed prosecutions of four suspects.

Texas is known for its writers of almost every genre – but maybe not so much for its writers of horror. And that could be seen as an oversight. The Texas talent pool has it’s dark side. And there is so much about the lone star state that is lurking in the shadows – and haunting the recesses of our minds.

The current leading Texas horror writers are collected in a new anthology called “Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers.”

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