Texas

The night of December 6th 1991 – Four girls – ages 17, 17, 15 and 13 were working and hanging out at a “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt!” store in Austin.

Eliza Thomas, Amy Ayers and sister Jennifer and Sarah Harbison were forced to strip, they were tied up, they were murdered – the shop was set on fire and the case is unsolved.

25 years after that night – it’s still a deep dark mystery.

“Who Killed These Girls? Cold Case: The Yogurt Shop Murders” explores in rich detail the kills and the flawed prosecutions of four suspects.

Texas is known for its writers of almost every genre – but maybe not so much for its writers of horror. And that could be seen as an oversight. The Texas talent pool has it’s dark side. And there is so much about the lone star state that is lurking in the shadows – and haunting the recesses of our minds.

The current leading Texas horror writers are collected in a new anthology called “Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers.”

From Texas Standard

After reports that Child Protective Services caseworkers have let thousands of children at risk for abuse and neglect slip through the system’s cracks, a select team of police will begin to search the state for them.

Texas joined the Confederacy on March 2, 1861.  About 70,000 men from Texas then joined the rebellious fight to preserve slavery. The women who stayed behind also did their part for the lost southern cause. 

From Texas Standard:

Wolf Boys” explores how a couple of Texas teenagers went from playing under the Friday night lights to working as assassins for Los Zetas, one of Mexico's most dangerous drug cartels.

The book reads like fiction, but it's a true story written by former Wall Street Journal reporter Dan Slater.


Pages