Expressing his admiration for a high school student's curiosity about science, President Obama has invited Ahmed Mohamed to the White House.

A tweet from the president reads: "Cool clock, Ahmed. Want to bring it to the White House? We should inspire more kids like you to like science. It's what makes America great."

From Texas Standard:

It's been called the checkpoint of the stars: Willie Nelson, Snoop Dogg and Fiona Apple have all been snagged at the Sierra Blanca Border Patrol checkpoint.

Musicians and other celebrities have been booked and charged for marijuana possession by Hudspeth County Sheriff Arvin West. But West now seems to be saying his days of cracking down on every joint and baggie may be over.

NPR Southwest Correspondent John Burnett just returned to Austin from West Texas, where he checked out that checkpoint.

"I wasn't holding. They passed me right through," Burnett says, for the record.

But what if Burnett had been carrying a personal amount of marijuana?

In Texas, from 1891 to 1922, there was a systematic and routine practice of the burning of African American men at the stake. It happened so often that the state averaged one fatal burning a year during that 31-year period. These didn’t happen in the backwoods in secret by hooded men, but in town squares in daylight with local politicians leading the cheering mobs.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Part of the Texas poet laureate’s job is to introduce the power of poetry to every corner of the state. And that’s a charge that current Texas Poet Laureate Carmen Tafolla takes very seriously.

Tafolla is launching a project called Planting Poet Trees – sowing seeds of inspiration in Texas Public Schools. She’s looking for schools that are dealing with shrinking budgets and underfunded libraries that she can engage with to participate in writing projects and poetry workshops.

From Texas Standard:

We talk a lot about how the trajectory of the nation turned in the months and years that followed September 11, 2001. One of the many lives that took a turn that day was that of David Peters.

He was a former Marine who reenlisted as an Army chaplain after 9/11. Peters was attached to a combat unit on the ground in Iraq and then served as a chaplain at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in New York. Although he now works and lives in Austin and the surrounding area, on September 11, 2015, Father Peters will return to New York. He’ll be giving a sermon at St. Paul’s Chapel near ground zero.