Texas

It's Blood In, Blood Out for the Aryan Brotherhood

Sep 20, 2016

From Texas Standard:

Editor’s note: This story contains graphic depictions of a crime.

The federal government is trying to disrupt the Texas operations of the Aryan Brotherhood, a white supremacist prison gang. It began in California in the 1960s and spread to Texas in the 1980s. Chapters formed across the country, but the federal government decided that those in Texas were among the most brutal and violent. In 2008, the federal government launched an aggressive six-year operation that landed 75 members of the Aryan Brotherhood in prison.

This highly exclusive, all-white criminal organization rarely talks to outsiders, least of to all members of the press. But NPR’s John Burnett spoke with James “Chance” Jones, a senior major in the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas (ABT).

 


What could be more Texan than Tacos? Tacos are a favorite food but where are the best tacos?

And how did tacos become a culinary super star that it is today?

Certainly this wasn't always the case. For generations tacos were considered a food of the underclass and not appropriate for polite society.

But tacos have arrived.

Mando Reyo calls himself a taco journalist and with Jarod Neece has written the book “The Tacos of Texas.”

It’s published by the University of Texas Press.

Philippe Henry

When people talk about the great American Alligator they most likely are thinking of the creatures in the Swamps of Louisiana or the everglades of Florida – but Texas has it’s gators too.

In Texas alligators can be found in 120 counties. And with the Human population in Texas expanding – encounters between people and alligators are on the increase. This produces the potential for dangerous situations.

But Louise Hayes says we don’t need to fear the gator but we do need to respect him.

This week the State House Select Committee on State and Federal Power and Responsibility heard invited testimony on Governor Greg Abbott’s plan to make major fundamental changes to the United States Constitution.

From Texas Standard:

For a while, we've known that human trafficking is a big problem in Texas. But a new study from D.C. advocacy group called the Polaris Project looked at nearly a decade's worth of data and found that much of human trafficking in Texas operates in illicit bars and cantinas.

My Lo Cook, director of Polaris' efforts in Mexico, says the cases in Houston center around cantinas, which researchers see as common venues for human trafficking in Southern California as well. Houston has more cases than other cities, Cook says, in part because local officials and organizations make the effort to link cases together and prosecute them.

 


Pages