The request was forwarded to me from a distant (fifth floor — I'm on the fourth) division of NPR.

It came from Justin Lucas, the head of NPR's Audience and Community Relations team. He's the go-to person here for requests from listeners, for information or permissions.

He'd gotten a letter from Beth Hansen, owner of Soup and Salad, a small sandwich shop in Easton, Md., a charming old town on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay.

Justin read me an excerpt of the request: "I'd love to make and sell Mama Stamberg's Cranberry Chutney. A portion of the proceeds ... "

Is the Thanksgiving panic setting in? If so, you're not alone. 'Tis the season for many over-worked Americans to fret over how they're going to throw together a huge meal in a limited window of time.

Flickr user jdolenga / cc

"Turkey Confidential" is the annual live call-in show from "The Splendid Table" with Lynne Rossetto Kasper and is designed to bail you out of any last-minute kitchen emergencies and provide a backdrop as you and your family prepare for the big day.

"Turkey Confidential" airs Thanksgiving morning from 10 a.m.-noon on KSTX 89.1 FM and KTXI 90.1 FM.

As you sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, consider this: how much energy it takes to produce and consume that food.

Throughout the year, transportation is responsible for 28 percent of our energy consumption. And there's a non-trivial bump right around Thanksgiving time. According to USA Today, more than 25 million people in the United States are expected to fly for the Thanksgiving holiday. 

Squash is the ultimate Thanksgiving food, not turkey. So says Chris Kimball, host of the PBS show America's Test Kitchen.

"Of all the things they served in that first Thanksgiving, there might not have been turkey," Kimball says. Early revelers may have dined on small birds or venison. "The one thing we know they did have was squash. So, if you want to go back to the first Thanksgiving, this is the item to start with."