Tijuana

Fronteras
9:27 am
Mon May 12, 2014

In Tijuana, These Sisters Rule The Boxing Ring

Kristin Wall www.kristinwalldesigns.com via Flickr

Fronteras: More high schools in Texas may start offering Mexican-American studies. Can you guess the political affiliation of a legislator just by looking at them? In Texas, it’s pretty simple. Experts say a new bi-national agreement just signed in San Antonio has the potential to solve a variety of issues. Boxing competes only with soccer as Tijuana’s most popular sport: We’ll hear about two sisters who are slugging their way into the spotlight.

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Fronteras Desk
1:55 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

Costly Reforms To Prevent Racial Profiling By Joe Arpaio's Office

Opponents of Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio briefly gathered in the lobby of the sheriff's office in early January in protest of his record.
Jude Joffe-Block Fronteras

Fronteras: Long-awaited rail connection linking large Mexican ports in Sinaloa and Michoacan to Texas will break ground in 2015. Arizona’s Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office is under a court order to prevent racial profiling. By some measures, Mexico might have some of the fastest Internet speeds in Latin America, but for Tijuana's ambitious tech entrepreneurs and aspiring professional gamers, it's still painfully slow.

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Fronteras Desk
1:56 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Drone Testing Starts In Texas

Engineers check over the RS-16 before it’s set for launch. This process can take at least an hour.
Joey Palacios TPR News

Fronteras: A university research team in Texas was one of six teams selected by the FAA to begin testing drones, but not everyone is keen on the idea. A little-known stretch of desert in southern New Mexico is the site of a proposed national monument but some fear its proximity to the border may invite illegal traffic. And a developer in Arizona embarks on an urban renewal project in a poor Phoenix barrio but how will this impact the area’s rich Latino past?

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Fronteras Desk
11:47 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Border Agents Can Search Your Computer, But Is There A Limit To What They Can Look At?

Chris Eudaily TPR News

Fronteras: In the New Year, Mexico will begin to implement a sweeping tax reform, but northern border communities are protesting the change. U.S. border inspectors have the right to look through your computer when you come into the U.S., but just how closely can they look into your files? Cookie-cutter housing developments for low-income workers are now a feature of many cities in Mexico, but the model isn’t working out. American tax dollars are helping change lives in Mexican border cities by putting people to work in the formal economy.

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Fronteras Desk
12:00 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

More Latino Families In The U.S. Breaking The Bank For Quiceañeras

Professional photographs of Julissa Canal greet guests as they enter the hall for her quiceañera.
Kate Sheehy Fronteras

Fronteras: Tijuana has long been a magnet for migrants from across Mexico, but the city’s rapid growth means urban planning is often a second thought. Bishops along the border collaborate on a call for immigration reform. A quinceañera is an important milestone for many young Latinas, and it's become good business in the U.S. Border fence construction continues in Texas  near a historical site. And we look at an experiment designed to re launch destroyed rural border economies on both sides of the Rio Grande.

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Fronteras Desk
2:33 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Deportation Protests Continue As Immigration Reform Prospects Wane

Demonstrators danced into the late afternoon in front of the ICE office in Phoenix under a banner they hung themselves on the front gate.
Jude Joffe-Block Fronteras

Fronteras: Activists are calling on President Obama to take administrative action to stop deportations as the chance of Congress passing a reform bill this year wanes. Hundreds of vulnerable towns in New Mexico are trying to avoid running out of water during this drought. We’ll hear about the challenges foreign doctors face when they come to the U.S. Also, a report on an award by the Hopi Foundation in Arizona for people who work with victims of torture to help them heal.

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Fronteras Desk
12:29 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Deportations Take Toll On Young People’s Mental Health

Centro Savila, an organization that offers counseling and other support services to immigrant families in Albuquerque, is growing, but the organization recently had to start a waiting list for new clients.
Sarah Gustavus New Mexico In Depth

Fronteras: Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio will now have a court-appointed monitor watching over his department. We have a two-part series examining how the deportation of family members can impact the mental health of young people. Conservationists in the southwestern border region are busy cleaning trash out of watersheds before winter rains hit. By involving the community, they hope to create allies in the fight for a healthy border environment. And, soon travelers arriving at Tijuana's airport will be able to cross, by bridge, directly into San Diego.

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Fronteras Desk
12:11 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

New Mexico Mental Health System Shakeup Under Scrutiny

Sidonie Squier, head of New Mexico's Human Services Department, defended the decision to freeze Medicaid funds at a Legislative Finance Committee hearing in July.
Bryant Furlow

Fronteras: New Mexico accused 15 of it's mental health providers of Medicaid fraud, froze all federal funds to the agencies, and handed management of the companies over to Arizona firms. Some say the transition isn't going so well. We remember an activist who spoke up for the people who find themselves stranded and destitute in Tijuana after being deported from the U.S. Catholic leaders are hoping a nationwide immigration mass will sway Congress on immigration reform. Also, the Navajo Nation is trying to balance resources with feral horse roundups.

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Fronteras Desk
11:42 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Immigrant Families With Mixed Legal Status In Limbo

Cynthia Alba, 19, is working legally in the United States for the first time after receiving deferred action last year. She said the possibility that immigration reform will stall once again, and her deferred action work permit will expire, terrifies her.
Heath Haussamen

Fronteras: Excessive alcohol consumption cost United States taxpayers more than $220 billion in 2006. Several hundred people living on the banks of the Tijuana river canal were evicted. What are they planning to do now? Immigrant families in the U.S. with mixed status wonder about the fate of immigration reform now that Congress is in recess. One of Mexico’s most isolated indigenous groups is fighting logging in old-growth forests. Also, hear how a civil rights giant is now a comic book hero.

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Fronteras
3:18 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Tijuana Breakfast Hall Serves People Who Are Deported

Deportees form up outside a Tijuana breakfast hall, where many will have their only substantive meal of the day.
Adrian Florido Fronteras

On Fronteras: We visit a Tijuana breakfast hall from which many deported folks try to figure out how to return to the U.S. An estimated 5,000 children of deported parents are wards of the state. When those parents are in Mexico, it can be difficult to convince social workers and judges across the border to reinstate custody. HUD is threatening to take back Navajo housing dollars.

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