Tijuana

Photo courtesy of The Refuge Ranch.

This week on Fronteras:

  • Human trafficking is an international crime, but Texas authorities are learning to understand it as a local atrocity.
  • The fight to get Mexican-American studies in public schools (6:18).
  •  How a family divided by the U.S.-Mexico border struggles to keep a sense of normalcy in their lives (16:20)


Wikimedia

·         Pope Francis’ Reason for Visiting Juarez

·         Tijuana Sees Drop In Some Serious Crimes

·         Technology Links Houston’s Homeless With Housing

·         Texas Voters A Big Prize For Clinton And Sanders

·         Funds Raised To Keep Albuquerque Indian Center Open

Pope Francis’ Reason for Visiting Juarez

Flickr user Fibonacci Blue / cc

On Fronteras this week:

·        Same-sex marriage is the law of the land but in Texas some county officials are resisting

·        A civil rights expert and legal scholar says efforts to slow implementation of Supreme Court rulings is nothing new.  He puts the same-sex marriage ruling into historical context.

·        Congressional Democrats are raising questions about detention centers holding women and children.

·        Tijuana residents are asking the government to save an old river habitat threatened by development.

Texas Tribune

— Last summer tens of thousands of unaccompanied Central American minors crossed the Rio Grande and entered the United States.  Many were fleeing violence in their countries.  Ambassador Thomas Shannon tells Fronteras the U.S. government is hoping a plan being implemented will prevent another wave of child migrants.  

—After living illegally for years in the United States many residents of  Tijuana, Mexico,  are being deported to Mexico.   Read on for why they're waiting in Tijuana.

Jill Replogle

Fronteras: Nearly a quarter of Texas business owners are foreign born. Texas entrepreneurs want more high-skilled visas. The private space company XCOR recently broke ground at the Midland International Airport. Some hope this new industry will stabilize the region’s traditionally oil and gas-based boom-and-bust economy. Some family members of the missing in Mexico hoped to find answers at a gruesome body disposal site discovered in Tijuana several years ago. But hope is dwindling for DNA evidence at this site where bodies were dumped.

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