tourism

Eileen Pace / TPR

The San Antonio Convention and Visitors Bureau is kicking off a new campaign to increase occupancy at area hotels during Fiesta week.

Krystal Jones, senior brand manager for the bureau, said locals often don’t try to book hotels, thinking they’re booked up long in advance.

"Fiesta, of course, is a busy time, and a lot of locals come and enjoy Fiesta. And automatically you think there might not be room at the hotels but we do have availability. We sit at about 70 percent," she said.

Flickr user *Aqualung (Chris Wraight) / cc

Ted Siebert, an internationally renowned sand sculptor, is leading a design team in building three massive artworks at the San Antonio Botanical Garden using 24 tons of sand.

The designs will include the Alamo and the Moy Grand Hibiscus flower.

The Moy Hibiscus was first produced at the Botanical Garden in a cross-breed experiment by Dr. Ying Doon Moy, whose colleagues eventually got the hibiscus planted along roads in China.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Mission San Juan Capistrano has had restoration work done numerous times over the years to keep it from collapse, and the tiny colonial church re-opened this week to its first mass since the extensive renovation started almost two years ago.

It was a big undertaking -- more work needed to be done than with any of the other mission restorations -- but San Juan was about to collapse. Its buttresses struggled to restrain the cracking walls, and the ground was giving way.

Baron Wiley

The William B. Travis “Victory or Death” letter from the Battle of the Alamo is back in San Antonio. The letter will be on exhibit at the Alamo for 13 days -- the same length of time the fortress was under siege -- and then will be returned to the state archives.

Under the watchful eyes of dozens of police officers, state troopers carried the letter into the Alamo before an audience of hundreds.

The fourth-generation great-nephew of Col. William B. Travis read a transcript of his uncle’s letter as it was carried past the crowd and into the Alamo shrine.

Photos: William Travis' 'Victory Or Death' Letter Returns To Alamo

Feb 15, 2013
 

In 1836, William Barret Travis famously wrote “Victory or Death” in his appeal for more troops during the Battle of The Alamo. 177 years later, the iconic letter is returning to the Alamo for a brief exhibit later this month.

Currently, the letter is safely held at Austin’s Texas State Archives and Library Building, away from the harmful UV rays that have deteriorated its condition. 

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