Toyota

Ryan E. Poppe

At a luncheon in Austin on Thursday, the head of Toyota-North America shared some of the company’s future plans, some of which include more jobs at the company’s San Antonio plant, which at this point cannot keep up with customer demand for light trucks.

 

Julie Hamp, the former Toyota executive arrested for allegedly mailing oxycodone pills to herself in Japan, was released from custody on Wednesday.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Tokyo prosecutors thought they had enough evidence to charge Hamp but didn't because they deemed justice had already been served:

Julie Hamp, Toyota Motor Corp.'s first senior female executive who was appointed head of public relations just weeks ago, has resigned after her arrest for allegedly importing the prescription painkiller oxycodone in violation of the country's narcotics laws.

Courtesy: NHTSA (safercar.gov)

WASHINGTON — Under pressure from U.S. safety regulators, Takata Corp. has agreed to declare 33.8 million air bags defective, a move that will double the number of cars and trucks included in what is now the largest auto recall in U.S. history.

The chemical that inflates the air bag can explode with too much force, blowing apart a metal inflator and sending shrapnel into the passenger compartment. The faulty inflators are responsible for six deaths and more than 100 injuries worldwide.

Updated at 3:13 p.m. ET

Japanese air bag supplier Takata says nearly 34 million vehicles were fitted with its defective inflator mechanisms, doubling the number of vehicles affected in the U.S., the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday.

The recall is believed to be the largest in NHTSA's history.

Pages