This summer, Lego will release its first-ever minifigure that uses a wheelchair, the company says, confirming reports that emerged after one of the toys was seen at a toy fair. In recent years, the company has been urged to show more diversity in its offerings.

In Time For The Holidays, Report Flags Dangerous Toys

Nov 30, 2015
Florian Martin / Houston Public Media

If you’re a parent of a small child, this voice may sound familiar to you:

“I’m Casey. This is my car. Vroom!”

What you may not know is that the sound from a Go-Go Smart Wheels car from V-tech was measured at 85 decibels next to the ear. That’s about the same level as a nearby blow-dryer or a kitchen blender.

It's almost impossible to think of a toy that's more ubiquitous than Lego bricks. The popular interlocking building blocks are everywhere — from the big screen to kids' rooms around the country.

So it may be hard to believe that in 2003, the Lego Group almost went bankrupt.

The company's near fall and meteoric rise is chronicled in the new film A LEGO Brickumentary.

Months after a girl took the company to task for its female toy figures, Lego has released the Research Institute, a play set created by a "real-life geophysicist, Ellen Kooijman," the company says.

This year’s survey of the most dangerous toys has turned up new hazards that are not always sold as toys. Magnets and watch batteries are causing concern among physicians in hospital emergency rooms.

The Trouble in Toyland report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group comes out just in time for the holiday shopping season each year, and commonly includes cautions about choking and strangulation hazards.