Trinity University

Amanda Hartfield

The worst wildfire in Texas history ravaged most of Bastrop County in September 2011. The blaze left many residents without homes and Bastrop County without much of its beloved Lost Pines. Thirty four thousand acres of the wooded land was torched.

One of the victims of the fire was Randy Fritz. He has written a book about how the fire impacted his him and his family and how they learned to deal with the experience Its called “Hail of Fire: A Man and His Family Face Natural Disaster”

Prolific poet of the Beat age, and Pulitzer-Prize winner, Gary Snyder has spent a lifetime reflecting and observing life both professionally and personally. 

His new book "Nobody Home: writing, buddhism, and living in places" brings his personal reflections to light through a 30-year correspondence with Julia Martin, South African writer and literary scholar.

Nate Howe

Trinity University is bringing a highly acclaimed musician to the school next week. He's organist Christopher Houlihan. (If you hit "Listen" you can hear him playing) I asked him what he loved about playing the organ.

“I love that it can be terrifyingly loud in one moment, and also have some of the softest, gentlest sounds. I love that it is so diverse and so, so colorful. And that is one of the things that really excites me about the organ.”

I told him that I'd seen footage of him playing--“You’re not that staid old lady at the church playing the organ.”

Chris Owyoung

Their music sounds almost other worldly. They’re called New York Polyphony, and if you’ve never heard of them, it’s because their musical genre is relatively obscure.

“Singing Latin, sacred, texted polyphony.”

It’s also called early music. That’s countertenor Geoffrey Williams. They’ve traveled the world and have many fans here in Texas. In fact…

“We’ve sung in the state of Texas more than we’ve sung in the state of New York.”

I had to interrupt--"So you’re saying New York Polyphony has sung more in Texas than it has in New York?"

Ford, Powell & Carson

A chance find in a basement has cast a new light on San Antonio’s not-so-distant past. It started out with an e-mail received by Trinity University Assistant Professor Kathryn O’Rourke.

“Kathryn, you’re not going to believe this. We have made this amazing discovery. I can’t even tell you over e-mail what it is, it’s so exciting.”

An intern named Jason had been sent to the basement to archive old files.

"Pretty typical intern grunt work, frankly,” said O'Rourke.

But O'Rourke says he found some sketches there that gave him pause.

Pages