UNESCO

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

The Trump administration has announced that the U.S. will withdraw from UNESCO, the United Nations' chief cultural and educational agency. In a statement released Thursday, the State Department said the move won't take effect for more than a year, noting the withdrawal will be as of Dec. 31, 2018.

WorldHeritageFestival.org

It’s been a year since the San Antonio Missions’ designation as a World Heritage site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO. 

The San Antonio World Heritage Festival is taking place this week with events and activities for all ages.

“We are hosting this event to not only celebrate the designation, but also promote awareness to residents and then to raise funds for projects and nonprofits that protect and preserve and maintain and connect,” said Colleen Swain, Director of San Antonio’s World Heritage Office.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

Over the weekend the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization voted to officially recognize the Spanish Missions of San Antonio, including the Alamo, as a World Heritage Site. It is the first Texas site found to be of"outstanding cultural or natural importance to the common heritage of humanity" by the international body.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

BONN — At a Sunday morning announcement in Germany, after votes were tallied at 6 a.m. Central time in the U.S., the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s World Heritage Committee approved the listing of San Antonio Missions as a world heritage site.

With this, the iconic landmarks of five Spanish Roman Catholic sites, built in the 18th century in and around what is now the city of San Antonio, become Texas’ first World Heritage site, and the 23rd in the United States, joining the likes of the Statue of Liberty, Yellowstone National Park, and the Grand Canyon.

nps.gov

Update:

Accolades are flowing in the wake of UNESCO’s naming San Antonio’s Spanish Missions as Texas’ first World Heritage site.

It joins a list of 22 other U.S. sites recognized by UNESCO including the Statue of Liberty, the Grand Canyon and the Taos, New Mexico, pueblos.

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