University of Texas

Marsha Miller / University of Texas

A select committee of state lawmakers that was exploring impeachment proceedings for University of Texas Regent Wallace Hall has dropped their investigation and moved to censure and admonish Hall’s inquiry involving admissions fixing at UT at Austin.  

It’s really hard to explain just how scary the 1960s were if you were a kid. For me, it all started with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 when I was 8. That was the first in a litany of horrible events that showed up on the news it seemed almost every night. And we were a family, like most were in those days, that watched the nightly news.

University of Texas System Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa told a Texas House committee that the UT Board of Regents relationship with UT at Austin President Bill Powers had become strained and his negotiated resignation had nothing to their impeachment investigation of Regent Wallace Hall. 

The Texas House Select Committee on Transparency in Government Agency Operation asked Cigarroa and the Board Chairman Paul Foster to explain some of the reasoning behind Powers negotiated resignation.

A federal appellate court in Texas has ruled that the state's flagship university can continue to use race as a factor in admissions.

"To deny UT Austin its limited use of race in its search for holistic diversity would hobble the richness of the educational experience," Judge Patrick Higginbotham wrote for a split panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Like any ugly, long-running confrontation between a husband and wife or next-door neighbors — or between anybody, really — it's hard to know exactly when the dispute between University of Texas President Bill Powers and Texas GOP Gov. Rick Perry truly began.

But in the end, when the dust settled, one thing was clear: When powerful university presidents and powerful governors tangle, the politician usually ends up on top.

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