urban revitalization

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Downtown San Antonio may be changing with the construction of the first office tower built there since the late 1980s.

A plan by Frost Bank, Weston Urban and the city of San Antonio is in the works in a public-private partnership to build an "iconic" office tower catty-corner to the current Frost Bank Tower on Houston Street.

In explaining the concept, Mayor Julián Castro said Thursday it's nothing but momentum that resulted in this complex deal. City leaders say that it will be cost-neutral to the taxpayers of San Antonio.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

The city of San Antonio's vacant building pilot program wants to reduce the number of empty structures and increase economic prosperity. The council approved the program last week.

All across the city are a patchwork of developed and underdeveloped neighborhoods. As the city hopes to strengthen the center city, reducing vacancy and blight is the first target. 

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Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Owners of vacant buildings in San Antonio could be in for a reality check with a new city pilot program aimed at revitalizing pockets of town.

But San Antonio city leaders have said they hope to help owners bring properties into compliance, not bombard them with fees and other costs that bring properties up to code.

The vacant and underutilized buildings policy is a pilot program that District 1 Councilman Diego Bernal has said is aggressive in trying to eradicate empty structures around town. But the pilot program will be extremely focused for the first 18 months.

Flickr User: Brandon Watts / cc

San Antonio is a poor city by several metrics. We have below average home ownership, above average poverty. San Antonio is also a cheap city with cost of living significantly lower than other like-sized cities. But what happens when housing prices valuations start to go up?

A study being conducted by Christine Drennon, director of urban studies at Trinity University, has had early findings coming in and the results are showing several neighborhoods with ascending property values.

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In spite of their emotional pleas, residents of the Mission Trail Mobile Home Park will be forced to move to make room for a $75 million development. Many people who spoke struck a chord with several council members and the mayor Thursday.

When it came time for the vote, Mayor Julián Castro reversed course from his usual push for progress. He said he could not support a zoning request to make the Mission Trail Mobile Home Park, located on the Mission Reach of the San Antonio River, a mixed-use development for shops and apartments.

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