urban revitalization

Flcikr user Aidan Wakely-Mulroney (aidaneus) / cc

The combined vacancy rate downtown is 29 percent according to Centro San Antonio, a nonprofit dedicated to helping revitalize the urban center.

Around the city center large historic buildings stand empty. Large urban tracts of land around the city hold broken down buildings, like the abandoned Lone Star Brewery on the Mission Reach -- large empty lots are all that remain of bulldozed houses dotting San Antonio's East Side. 

Texas Almanac 2014-2015

Unprecedented urban sprawl in Northwest Bexar County has officials pulling out their strategies for infrastructure improvements to do a  better job of keeping up with the growth. The first part of the county’s plans were unveiled at a public meeting Monday evening.

The attraction of no city taxes and lower home prices has lured thousands of new residents to densely-constructed subdivisions in a short period of time. Some experts have compared the growth to a city the size of Kerrville.  

San Antonio River Authority

On Tuesday Bexar County Commissioners will consider some of the contracts for renovation of San Pedro Creek.

The San Pedro Creek restoration project announced last May has been touted as the second River Walk for downtown. The project starts at Fox Tech and runs southward and ties into the trails at Mission Concepción.

County Judge Nelson Wolff said it will take over 40 acres out of the flood zone and make them developable.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

As Texas Public Radio reported to you last month, San Antonio's downtown building vacancy rate is at 29 percent. Now that USAA has announced plans to locate some of its employees in a building downtown, city leaders hope more will follow.

The insurance company announced that 150 workers will report to One Riverwalk Place on the northeast corner of North St. Mary's and Convent in September. They'll occupy only a few floors of the tower bought by USAA Real Estate Company last year.

District 8 Councilman Ron Nirenberg praised the score for downtown.

Gonzalo Rodriguez / Duable

In a city like San Antonio, the question has become: Is the city growing in a way that is pushing long-time residents out of neighborhoods as it transforms?

Seeing examples from across the country of growth that completely takes over a town and forces generations of families out of their homes due to wealthier people infiltrating areas, District 1 Councilman Diego Bernal thinks it's time to study how San Antonio grows.

It may not ever be a problem, he said, but he doesn't want to be caught off guard.

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