U.S. Fish and Wildlife

From Texas Standard.

Much debris has been cleared out, but three months after Harvey’s landfall, the ecological damage is still being assessed. Not long after the storm clouds cleared, oyster and shrimp farmers lamented the hit to their livelihoods from extensive rains and runoff.

But researchers at the University of Houston at Clear Lake have been looking at the storm’s effect on other marine life, too – and they’ve discovered that bottlenose dolphins, have developed some puzzling ailments after the storm. Kristi Fazioli, a research associate with the Environmental Institute of Houston at the University of Houston Clear Lake, helps study this population.

A Texas hunter who paid $350,000 for the right to hunt a rare black rhino in Namibia has killed the animal. The hunt has drawn controversy and spurred debate over the best way to manage endangered wildlife.

Corey Knowlton won an auction last January for a hunting permit that would allow him to kill a black rhino weighing around 3,000 pounds.

Lumber Liquidators says the U.S. Department of Justice is seeking criminal charges against it in an investigation over imported products.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

Padre Island National Seashore has reopened its beaches after cleanup of the oil spill that made its way from Galveston to the southern coastline.

But farther up the coast, government agencies and volunteers are still struggling to clean up the oil that settled in at Matagorda Island, while protecting its wildlife.

It’s been more than two weeks since a barge in the Houston Ship Channel spilled 168,000 gallons of oil into Galveston Bay. It took a while for the oil to drift southward to the pristine beaches that draw more than 300 bird species each spring. 

Flickr user shankar s. / cc

A North Texas club’s auction of a rare permit that will allow the winner to shoot an endangered black rhino is drawing criticism from international conservationists.

The Dallas Safari Club has obtained a rare permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and permission from the African nation of Namibia to shoot one of five endangered black rhinos.

Attorney John J. Jackson III is a member of the club and helped orchestrate the auction that he said will go to protecting the animal.

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