U.S. Supreme Court

Jack Greenberg, one of the lawyers who argued the landmark Supreme Court case that ended federal tolerance of racial segregation in schools, died Wednesday. He was 91.

Greenberg was a giant of the Civil Rights era. He argued 40 cases before the nation's highest court, fighting against segregation, employment discrimination and the death penalty.

As Thurgood Marshall began a career on the federal bench that would eventually take him to the Supreme Court, he hand-picked Greenberg to take his place as the second director of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

The Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in the case of Duane Buck, a convicted Texas murderer sentenced to die after a psychologist testified that he was more likely to commit violent crimes in the future because he is black.

Buck shot and killed his ex-girlfriend in front of her three children while she begged for her life. He killed the man he thought she was sleeping with and he shot his own stepsister, Phyllis Taylor, who survived the horrific night.

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump expanded his list of potential Supreme Court nominees Friday.

The new list consists of 10 more possible nominees, including a U.S. senator who has refused to endorse Trump.

Trump's additional list, coming just days before the first debate, suggests he wants to add diversity to his earlier all-white list of eight men and three women. The second list, like the first, consists of bedrock conservatives, many with records hostile to abortion rights, same-sex marriage, and federal regulations.

The country sits at a turning point. An President of one party makes several appointments to the Supreme Court and many of the opposing party are concerned about the political makeup and a legal departure from the Court of the past. 


Ryan E. Poppe / TPR News

The Supreme Court voted 4-4 Thursday to block President Obama’s plan to shield as many as four million undocumented immigrants from deportation. While some say it’s a win for law-abiding citizens, others fear it may tear families apart.