UT Health Science Center

UT Health Science Center

Dr. James Lechleiter, professor of cellular and structural biology at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio, has received a patent for a discovery that could be good news for injured soldiers, athletes and other trauma victims.

Lechleiter discovered that a class of compounds actually protects neurons in the brain after a traumatic brain injury.

The research on cell and animal models has shown that two compounds stimulate the brain’s caretaker cells, called astrocytes, to do their job.

Flickr user @doug88888 / cc

In the first segment:

On Friday the FDA approved a new drug that, when taken in conjunction with other older remedies, cures 95 percent of Hepatitis C patients in a fraction of the time the old treatment regimen did. Hepatitis C, the liver degenerating disease, affects over three million U.S. citizens, and, surpassing HIV, last year killed over 15,000 people.

The San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the world’s largest breast cancer conference, gets underway on Tuesday, where more than 7,000 physicians and researchers from countries across the globe will witness groundbreaking presentations.

Breast cancer news coming out of this symposium is so rapid that organizers plan multiple press conferences for media around the world to get the stories. Often researchers will complete important research projects just before the meeting, so the findings can be presented here.

UT Health Science Center

The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio and the Methodist Healthcare System have announced an affiliation agreement for a children’s hospital in the Medical Center.

The two organizations issued a joint statement late this afternoon indicating they have agreed on all major aspects of their relationship and are moving forward to obtain regulatory approval for their agreement.

UTHSC

About 75,000 new cases of lymphoma are diagnosed in the U.S. each year, and many are fatal, but a local researcher is entering the final year of study on a project that he hopes will greatly improve lymphoma survival rates.

For four years, Dr. Ricardo Aguiar at UT Health Science Center’s School of Medicine has been working under a grant from the Voelcker Fund to develop lymphoma treatments that are more effective and less toxic.

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