UT Health Science Center

UTHSC

About 75,000 new cases of lymphoma are diagnosed in the U.S. each year, and many are fatal, but a local researcher is entering the final year of study on a project that he hopes will greatly improve lymphoma survival rates.

For four years, Dr. Ricardo Aguiar at UT Health Science Center’s School of Medicine has been working under a grant from the Voelcker Fund to develop lymphoma treatments that are more effective and less toxic.

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A San Antonio physician has completed a study that shows renal artery stents should no longer be recommended for patients with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. The new recommendations are predicted to save millions of dollars in future medical costs.

Dr. William Henrich, president of San Antonio’s UT Health Science Center, found that millions of renal stents placed in older patients with kidney disease and high blood pressure may not have done any good -- and created billions of costs in Medicare dollars.

UT Health Science Center

The School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center has been named one of the top three best medical schools for Hispanics in the U.S.

The national ranking came from "HispanicBusiness" magazine and honors the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio for its use of progressive programs to recruit, support and mentor Hispanic medical students.

South Texas Environmental Education and Research

In the first segment:

As the United States becomes a net exporter of oil for the first time since 1995, the Eagle Ford Shale deposit hums away with activity. The environmental costs have been becoming better documented and one correlation becomes stronger and stronger -- the link between certain hydraulic fracturing disposal methods and earthquakes.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio received a major contract to train military flight medics for more intensive paramedic certification.

The program is the first of its kind and the only one in the United States.

When Army medics fly out on a call for casualties, they are in rescue mode -- wrap them up and get ‘em out of there.

But the Department of Defense was seeking a higher level of training for its medics, and the UTHSC responded with a pilot program that has now turned into a five-year commitment.

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