vaccines

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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

EdTech Stanford School of Medicine

 

Since the measles outbreak began in December, 121 people have been affected by the virus. The illness has continued to spread, reaching three new states--11 in all--not including Washington, D.C., as of this week.   

By CDC/NIP/Barbara Rice (http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/ (ID#: 132)) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

San Antonio health officials say the outbreak of measles in California traced to Disneyland hasn't made its way to South Texas. At least not yet. 

Texas Public Radio’s Shelley Kofler talked with Dr. Thomas Schlenker, Director of Health for the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, about concerns. Who is most at risk? Why aren't some children vaccinated? Read excerpts from the interview below.

As expected, this year's flu vaccine looks like it's pretty much of a dud.

The vaccine only appears to cut the chances that someone will end up sick with the flu by 23 percent, according to the first estimate of the vaccine's effectiveness by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

  

Measles, whooping cough, and other long since forgotten diseases are making a come back. A new PBS Nova special "Vaccines: Calling The Shots" wants to take us back to school on the subject of vaccines.
It explores the thought and history behind vaccinations. 

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