Veterans

Virginia Alvino / Texas Public Radio News

The unemployment rate for veterans in the U.S. recently reached an all-time low - below five percent. But in Texas, that number is higher. A job fair was held Wednesday in the Military City specifically for service members and their spouses.

More than 80 employers tabled at the AT&T Center to recruit employees. These organizations from Starbucks to the Border Patrol, are looking specifically for veterans.

Clay Hull has a stubborn sense of justice.

After an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq ended his time in the military, he fought the Army and the Department of Veterans Affairs over the amount of compensation they awarded him for his injuries.

"If I'm in the wrong, I'll admit it. But I'm not going to let somebody just push me around, especially the VA," he says.

It was complicated and drawn out, but Hull now gets the maximum the VA pays for disability.

Jay Porter / U.S. Office of Personnel Management

The federal government has been steadily increasing the number of veterans it employs since President Obama issued an Executive Order in 2009 to do so. Yesterday, local veterans actively seeking federal employment gathered in San Antonio to learn about opportunities. 

When Anthony McCann opened a thick manila envelope from the Department of Veterans Affairs last year, he expected to find his own medical records inside.

Instead, he found over 250 pages of deeply revealing personal information on another veteran's mental health.

"It had everything about him, and I could have done anything with it," McCann said in an interview.

The Obama administration says it wants to end veterans homelessness by the end of this year — but it's not going to happen. That's partly because, despite government support, many landlords remain reluctant to rent to homeless individuals.

At the end of October, almost 6,200 homeless military veterans had government vouchers to cover their rent, but they had yet to find landlords willing to accept them. Among those vets is Joseph Coles of Washington, D.C., where you're lucky to get a one-bedroom apartment for less than $1,400 a month.

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