Voter I.D.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

This week on Fronteras: 

--Federal judges have ruled that Texas’ controversial Voter I-D law violates the Voting Rights Act.

--New research says global warming threatens Texas’ economy.  A group of business leaders say the data makes a financial case for the reduction of greenhouse gases now.  

--A new digital app developed in Houston helps disaster victims file for assistance.

-- Two Dallas non-profits are working together to provide housing for homeless veterans.

On Thursday Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton delivered a speech in Texas on voting rights. Speaking at the historically black Texas Southern University Clinton called out Republicans, including former Governor Rick Perry, who she said have restricted voting rights. And Clinton called for the expansion of voting opportunities in America.

SEIU Walk a Day in My Shoes 2008 / Wikimedia Commons

WASHINGTON — Seeking an expansion of voting rights, Hillary Rodham Clinton plans to call for an early voting period of at least 20 days in every state and push back against Republican-led states that have sought restrictions on voting access.

The Democratic presidential candidate is speaking Thursday at Texas Southern University in Houston, a historically black university. Democrats have filed legal challenges to voting changes from GOP lawmakers in the presidential battleground states of Ohio and Wisconsin.

Clinton’s campaign said she intends to denounce voting restrictions in North Carolina, Texas, Florida and Wisconsin and encourage states to adopt a new national standard of no fewer than 20 days of early in-person voting, including weekend and evening voting.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

In the political battles over voting rights in Texas frequently the accusation is made that redistricting and voter ID are driven by attempts to reduce the impact of minority voters in the state. It’s a charge that the Republicans behind the laws and maps flatly deny. However a new book “Latinos and the Voting Rights Act,” builds a case that voter ID and redistricting are designed exactly to reduce Hispanic voter outcomes.

During the recent voting process in Texas polling officials were dealing with the implementation of Voter I.D.  Voters had to provide photo identification before they could cast a ballot. The law was on again and off again after a federal judge in Corpus Christi found that the law was an unconstitutional poll tax and deliberately discriminated against minority voters. The judge threw out voter i.d. for the midterms but it was put back in place on appeal. But that’s not all that was in the ruling.

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