Voter I.D.

From Texas Standard:

Federal courts aren't showing much love this summer for Texas laws. In June, the Supreme Court ruled that the state's 2013 abortion laws impose an undue burden on women, and Wednesday, the conservative Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals says the photo ID requirement for Texas voters is asking too much.

Flickr user Adam Fagen (afagen) / cc

The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected an emergency appeal to halt the required use of photo ID’s by voters in Texas, but the court said it could revisit the issue as the November elections approach.

The requirement has remained in effect though a trial judge struck down the legislative requirement in 2014 and an appellate judge last year said the requirement discriminates against minority voters.

The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans is scheduled to hear the case in May.

NPR

 

·         GOP Candidates Face Off On Immigration

·         What’s Motivating Texas Republicans To Vote

·         Polls Show Sanders With Solid Lead In Texas

·         Study Says Voter ID Laws Reduce Minority Turnout

·         Student Diversity Leads To Diverse Food In Schools

·         Rio Grande Bosque Trail Is Wheelchair Friendly

·         Literacy Campaign Gives Bilingual Books To New Moms

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Confusion over Texas' voter photo identification requirement potentially discouraged as many as 9 percent of registered voters from going to the polls in the November 2014 elections in the Latino-majority U.S. Congressional District 23 (CD-23), according to a new study by Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and the University of Houston Hobby Center for Public Policy.

Todd Wiseman / Texas Tribune

This week on Fronteras: 

--Federal judges have ruled that Texas’ controversial Voter I-D law violates the Voting Rights Act.

--New research says global warming threatens Texas’ economy.  A group of business leaders say the data makes a financial case for the reduction of greenhouse gases now.  

--A new digital app developed in Houston helps disaster victims file for assistance.

-- Two Dallas non-profits are working together to provide housing for homeless veterans.

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