war on drugs

Heroin, today, is killing more and more people in rural America.

One Mexican cartel has seeded low-cost heroin around rural towns in the Southwest and Midwest, selling it cheap and easy, almost like pizza.

Madison, Neb. — population 2,500 — is just a speck of a town, a two-hour drive from the big-city bustle of Omaha. But it's not far enough away to avoid the growing impact of heroin.

"The world's gotten smaller," says Police Chief Rod Waterbury. "If drugs can make it to Chicago, they can make it here."

Sundar1 / Wikimedia Commons

A Texas senate committee has been tasked with finding a legal loophole so that the state can drug-test people receiving unemployment. Committee members have been told to find a way the state can bypass the adoption of federal regulations.

Senate Bill 21 was passed during the 2013 legislative session set to take effect at the beginning of 2014. But the U.S. Department of Labor still hasn’t approved a new set of rules regarding unemployment drug-testing. 

Flickr user Julie Tuason - http://bit.ly/1fylwXo / cc

The U.S. Department of Justice announced last week that President Obama wanted to consider additional clemency applications based on a new set of factors that would allow for more just outcomes for nonviolent drug offenders.

Lorne Matalon

Fronteras: Federal prosecutors in Texas and New Mexico are dealing with an unusual case involving a man from a Mennonite community in Mexico. We take you into the fields of New Mexico where workers are cleaning out an ancient irrigation system. These hand-dug ditches may help retain precious river water in times of drought. Further south, drought is forcing a Mexican city to ration water -- and it's only spring.

 A select number of Texas senators heard from groups operating along the Texas-Mexico border this week. This group of lawmakers is looking ahead of the 2015 legislative session for the possibility of increasing the state budget for border security.

Lawmakers seated on the Texas Senate Committee on Agriculture, Rural Affairs and Homeland Security heard from Col. Steve McCraw, the head of the Texas Department of Public Safety, about their operations along the border. 

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