Water

The Water Rescue Foundation

The Federal Emergency Management Agency spent $361 million on bottled water in Puerto Rico by the end of January, after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island in September.


Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

“We take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude,” Dr. Tom Arsuffi stressed near the beginning of the most recent Texas Water Symposium. The panel discussion, moderated by Katherine Romans, Executive Director of the Hill Country Alliance, also brought together District 53 Rep. Andy Murr and Texas A&M researcher Hughes Simpson to discuss the preservation of natural assets.

Bob Nichols, USDA. Public domain / USGS

They tell you in Texas, "don’t curse those rainy days" because you never know when the rain will stop — and stop and stop.

On this episode of "Texas Matters," we talk to Seamus McGraw about his new book, “A Thirsty Land: The Making of an American Water Crisis” and what Texans can look forward to as the population grows and the state's water supply dries up.


From Texas Standard:

The Rio Grande isn't as full as it used to be. And that's a problem for everyone who shares the river. Texas claims that New Mexico is keeping more than its fair share of the water. And it's actually suing that state and Colorado in a case that's gone to the Supreme Court.

But the Rio Grande doesn't just flow through the U.S. It also feeds Mexico. Officials on both sides of the border are concerned about water scarcity, and they are taking new measures to conserve the resource.

Springs Of South Central Texas

Mar 15, 2018
David Martin Davies

Springs of South Central Texas: Gregg Eckhardt is an environmental scientist with 29 years of experience in environmental modeling and analysis, water resource planning and development, state and federal permitting, and water treatment. He is known as "The Nerd King of South Texas Water History." In this lecture recorded on March 10 for Headwaters at Incarnate Word, he describes San Antonio's colorful water history and the importance of Edwards Aquifer springs to the region's cultural and economic development.

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