Water

SAWS

Standing in front of the San Antonio City Council, barely able to reach the microphone atop the broad wood podium, Verna Dement carried a stack of papers.

The Lee County woman had come to the Alamo City to ask the council to hold up on voting for the Vista Ridge Pipeline Project, a $3.4 billion, 142-mile pipeline, which would draw water from Dement’s neighboring Burleson County, to provide San Antonio and potentially, other cities along the I-35, water for decades to come.

Imagine Manhattan under almost 300 feet of water. Not water from a hurricane or a tsunami, but purified drinking water — 2.1 trillion gallons of it.

That's the amount of water that researchers estimate is lost each year in this country because of aging and leaky pipes, broken water mains and faulty meters.

Fixing that infrastructure won't be cheap, which is something every water consumer is likely to discover.

SAWS

The future of San Antonio's water supply may be all but assured by a city council vote tomorrow. The deal would secure 50,000 acre feet of water for the city at a cost of $3.4 billion. Vista Ridge, the company with the water rights, will transport the water 142 miles from Burleson County and the Carrizo Wilcox Aquifer.

The Mayor has already voted affirmatively on  it as a San Antonio Water System board member and many on the council have voiced support, including district 9 Council Member Joe Krier. 

A Regional Water Forum On Our Future

Oct 27, 2014
Iris Dimmick / Photo courtesy of the Rivard Report

On Wednesday, October 8, Mission Verde Alliance and KLRN hosted a forum on the future of water use and technology in South Texas, moderated by journalist Robert Rivard. The goal of the forum was for it to be a forceful call to action, to spur new thinking, encourage innovation and creativity, embrace tough issues, and launch bold new initiatives. Major topics covered:

SAWS

The San Antonio Water System has settled on the Abengoa Vista Ridge pipeline and is asking the City Council to confirm their 581-page contract.

A vote would ultimately seal the deal on the public-private partnership; a partnership that would increase the city's water portfolio by more than 20 percent. The 142-mile pipeline, needed to pump the 16 billion gallons of water annually to San Antonio, starts in the Burleson County portion of the Carrizo Aquifer.

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