Water

A Regional Water Forum On Our Future

Oct 27, 2014
Iris Dimmick / Photo courtesy of the Rivard Report

On Wednesday, October 8, Mission Verde Alliance and KLRN hosted a forum on the future of water use and technology in South Texas, moderated by journalist Robert Rivard. The goal of the forum was for it to be a forceful call to action, to spur new thinking, encourage innovation and creativity, embrace tough issues, and launch bold new initiatives. Major topics covered:

SAWS

The San Antonio Water System has settled on the Abengoa Vista Ridge pipeline and is asking the City Council to confirm their 581-page contract.

A vote would ultimately seal the deal on the public-private partnership; a partnership that would increase the city's water portfolio by more than 20 percent. The 142-mile pipeline, needed to pump the 16 billion gallons of water annually to San Antonio, starts in the Burleson County portion of the Carrizo Aquifer.

SAWS

A coalition of environmental groups and community advocates are pushing to delay a city council vote on the San Antonio Water System's Vista Ridge deal until next June when a new Mayor and city council will be in session. Council is slated to take up the issue after a vote by SAWS board this morning.

Eileen Pace

    

Community and environmental groups came together Thursday to question what they say is a rush to approve an expensive pipeline to bring water to San Antonio from the Hill Country.

Members of the Sierra Club, COPS/Metro and concerned ratepayers called a press conference to announce their concerns about the Vista Ridge Pipeline vote that the SAWS board moved to this Monday with short notice.

The San Antonio Water System moved up its board vote on the Vista Ridge Pipeline by a week, saying timing is critical.

SAWS

The Vista Ridge pipeline and water deal is off the drawing board and inhabiting the 300+ pages of a contract that the San Antonio Water System board will have to consider and vote on next Monday.

142 miles of pipe, roughly 5' in diameter would run from Burleson county, Texas bringing with it 16 billion gallons of water annually. It adds nearly 25 percent more water than the city currently consumes. 

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