Wendy Davis

During the first gubernatorial debate between Democratic Fort Worth State Sen. Wendy Davis and her Republican opponent, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, Davis went on the attack. Political experts say Davis’ offensive strategy was anticipated, but not what she needed to gain enough traction.

The candidates running for Texas governor, Republican Attorney General Greg Abbott and Democratic State Sen. Wendy Davis, held their first televised debate on Friday in heavily Hispanic South Texas, in the border county of Hidalgo in the Rio Grande Valley.

The county is 90 percent Hispanic. It was the first gubernatorial debate on the border since 1998.

Republicans have won every statewide office in Texas for 20 years, but the fast-growing Hispanic population tends to vote Democrat, and many Republicans believe their survival lies in recruiting Hispanic supporters.

Ryan Poppe/David Martin Davies / TPR News

With the November election less than 60 days away, political battles and news bits continue to come to the fore.

Two separate polls have placed Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis within 8 points of her Republican opponent, Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott. This comes on the heals of Davis' memoir being released that disclosed pregnancy complications she said resulted in two abortions. 

Wendy Davis, the Democratic candidate for the governor of Texas, came to the attention of most Americans outside Texas when, as state senator, she filibustered a highly restrictive abortion bill for 11 straight hours.

Now Davis is making headlines for her newly released memoir, Forgetting to Be Afraid. In the book, Davis revealed for the first time that she had two abortions herself. She also details her gritty and sometimes unhappy life growing up, first in Rhode Island and then Texas, Oklahoma and California.

Ryan E. Poppe

Wendy Davis' Republican gubernatorial opponent Greg Abbott has gone from asking for a general inquiry regarding Davis' book sales and promotional activity to launching a formal complaint with the Texas Ethics Commission.

The Abbott campaign filed the formal complaint during the first stop of Davis’ book signing tour in Austin.

In a statement, the Abbott campaign’s Matt Hirsch writes:

"Sen. Davis' book promotion has gone from ethically questionable to outright unlawful,"  

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