West Explosion

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The senator representing the town of West shared his first-hand account of the damages related to the fertilizer plant explosion and memorializes those who died during the fire.

Only a railroad separated West’s intermediate school from the fertilizer plant that exploded last week. The blast destroyed that school -- and left three out of four West ISD campuses unusable. But many West students are going to finish the school year, just not in West. 

Environment Texas

State environmental group are calling for a thorough investigation of the fertilizer plant in the town of West following the fire and explosion that killed 14 people and injured about 200.

Luke Metzger, the executive director for Environment Texas, said there were too many glaring defects at the West fertilizer plant for someone not to notice.

Update at 6 p.m. ET. Death Toll Rises:

The Texas Department of Public Safety now confirms 14 have died as a result of the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas.

Update at 11:15 a.m. ET. Firefighters Unaccounted For:

@sdotmaterson / Instagram

Dr. Emily Kidd, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Health at the UT Health Science Center, said she was in West from midnight Wednesday to 4 a.m. Thursday to assist at the scene of the explosion.

Kidd said she was impressed with what local responders had been able to do in such a short period of time:

"Initially I thought that we were going to be seeing a lot of patients, however, by the time I arrived, the far majority of the patients had actually already been triaged, treaded and transported to area hospitals," Kidd said.

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