West Side

Jack Morgan / TPR Arts

Bus shelters may seem like a mundane place for art. But as I found out, not if you’re in San Antonio.
They are bright red, green, orange, purple and pink. And there's a reason for that.

“This is seen as a gateway to this cultural corridor, this district,” said San Antonio Public Art Manager Jimmy LeFlore.

“These different bus stops are a point of departure and a point of entry, and now, with the artists designs, which we’re dedicating today, it really celebrates the arts in this area,” LeFlore said.

We’ve been looking at the San Pedro Creek Project from north to south, and now we’re down to its last section, called Campo Abajo, or the Lower Field. This stretch goes from Guadalupe Street to South Alamo.

"There’s already economic development happening," said San Antonio River Authority’s Suzanne Scott about the area. "The new Kipp Academy is going to be located in this stretch and we’ve already been in conversations with them about having educational opportunities for the kids."

San Antonio River Authority

Bexar County has put aside $125 million to completely re-do a two-mile stretch of downtown’s San Pedro Creek. I've been looking at the plan in detail, and it is  pretty amazing. Currently the creek is a concrete drainage ditch, but what designers and engineers have imagined is something that looks a bit like a narrower Museum Reach.

The original reasoning for the project is flood control and water quality improvements; both to be accomplished through an underground overflow tunnel, with the added cleansing benefit that re-circulated water is pumped from it.

San Antonio River Authority

The San Pedro Creek project has been making a lot of headlines of late. This is a series to get Bexar County residents aware of what its creators say it will bring. First, you have to know where the project will happen. San Pedro creek flows roughly north to south on the west side of downtown. As far as being an attractive creek, it’s not.

"Over the years it’s become a highly neglected eyesore," said Precinct 2 County Commissioner Paul Elizondo, who cites its location and history.

The San Antonio River Authority is executing another massive project based on one of the city’s waterways.

Coming on the heels of its now five-year-old Museum Reach, and its nearly finished Mission Reach transformations of the San Antonio River, the San Antonio River Authority will soon exercise that authority over another of the city’s smaller waterways.  

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