Texas is known for a few things... the Dallas Cowboys (sorry Houston fans), Tex-Mex (it's in the name), and the border. But while its politicians may be red, wine still isn't the first thing people think about the Lone Star State, despite a burgeoning industry. 

According to the Texas Wine and Grape Growers Assocation they saw an 88 percent growth between 2005 and 2013, with nearly $2 billion in economic impact. But how good is Texas wine? And how does it compare?

Big, bold wines have their fans. But with the arrival of summer, make room for a bumper crop of lighter, more subtle wines.

"Low-alcohol wines are super hot right now," says wine writer Katherine Cole.

There's Txakoli, or Txakolina, wines from the Basque region of Spain, Rieslings from Germany and New York state, and Vinho Verde from Portugal, to name a few.

These wines typically hover in the 9 percent to 11 percent alcohol range. This compares to about 13 percent to 14 percent in a typical California chardonnay.

A lot of artists say they find inspiration in unlikely places. Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent, designers based in Ensenada, Mexico, most often find theirs digging through dumpsters and junkyards.

Their work, however, isn't remotely trashy. One of their latest creations, the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley, is sleek and totally modern. It's one of a growing number of wineries that's designed to give visitors a memorable visual experience — not just a taste of fine wine.

Courtesy Johny Rosa

Boerne will be hopping with art over the weekend for Second Saturday Art and Wine.

“Second Saturday is a show we put on every month, so it happens twelve times a year," said Johny Rosa , who owns Texas Treasures Fine Art Gallery, a Second Saturday participant.

“We have market days down in the square in Boerne. It goes from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.. And then from 4 p.m.-8 p.m. is the gallery tour,” Rosa said.

Lorne Matalon / Fronteras

Fronteras: After Arizona’s immigration enforcement law strained that state’s relations with Mexico, things seem to be getting friendlier. Why Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto spent the day in a tiny border town. The high cost of liquor licenses in New Mexico. Finally, the USDA's ban on its inspectors entering Mexico at border crossings to inspect cattle has crippled an important part of the border economy.