Witte Museum

Witte Museum Is Being Transformed

Feb 9, 2015

Ground has been broken on a major transformation of the Witte Museum.  It’s the start of a $60 million two-year project.  The vast alterations include renovations and expansion of the main museum building, as well as the Mays Family Center for special events and blockbuster exhibitions.  Texas Public Radio Arts and Culture reporter Jack Morgan did a two-part feature last July. Click the links below.  

The Witte Museum reveals clues for a mystery millions of years in the making.

“We knew about three or four tracks and we thought we had maybe 20 or 25 tracks total, but we ended up uncovering about 150 additional tracks over the last two weeks,” said Dr. Thomas Adams, who curates paleontology at the Witte Museum. The tracks he’s talking about are dinosaur tracks.

“Are they in a fairly central location together?” I asked.

“They are. They’re actually -- it’s a relatively small area in Government Canyon State Natural Area,” Adams said.

Gallagher and Associates

The Witte Museum is undergoing a massive transformation. On the last report I detailed the Witte’s huge re-imagining, but any look at the future is made more interesting by looking at the past. I spoke with Witte President and CEO Marise McDermott about the museum’s history.

Courtesy of Lake Flato

One of the city’s oldest institutions is changing, and in a very big way.

"We’re adding 65,000 sq. ft., some of which is renovated space, some of which is new space," said Marise McDermott, president and CEO of the Witte Museum.

“The Witte is going through a major transformation, we’re very excited," she said. "It’s so radical, or so dramatic, that we are calling it the new Witte.”

Julie Ledet, Witte Museum

Just in time for summer exploring, there’s a new exhibit at the Witte Museum called the H-E-B Body Adventure powered by University Health System.

Curator of Archeology and Health Bryan Bayles calls it a “brand new, four-story, indoor-outdoor interactive experience that’s all about health IQ, empowerment and wellness.”

While that sounds a bit nerdy and wonkish, the actuality is anything but. During my visit I saw dozens of children going from exhibit to exhibit, interacting as they were supposed to, and very likely, learning all the while.

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