World War I

Parallels
2:25 am
Thu December 25, 2014

A Century Ago, When The Guns Fell Silent On Christmas

British and German soldiers fraternizing at Ploegsteert, Belgium, on Christmas Day 1914. World War I was raging at the time, but front-line troops initiated the truce, which they documented in photos and letters. Commanders on both sides were furious when they learned of it.
Courtesy of Imperial War Museum

Originally published on Thu December 25, 2014 6:00 am

A century ago, young men in Europe were killing each other by the tens of thousands. World War I, which had erupted just a few months earlier, was raging. Yet on a frozen Christmas Eve, the guns briefly fell silent.

The Christmas Truce of 1914 has become the stuff of legend, portrayed in films, television ads, and songs. On this 100th anniversary of the cease-fire, it is possible to reconstruct the events of that day from letters, diaries, and even the recorded spoken words of the men who experienced the truce.

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Arts & Life
8:11 am
Fri September 26, 2014

One Sculptor's Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint

Plaster casts taken from soldiers' mutilated faces (top row), new sculpted faces (bottom row), and final masks (on the table) sit in the studio of Anna Coleman Ladd in 1918.
American Red Cross Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

Originally published on Mon October 6, 2014 1:02 pm

Sometimes art can change how people see the world. But Anna Coleman Ladd made art that changed how the world saw people.

It was World War I, and soldiers were coming home from the battlefield with devastating injuries. Those who survived were often left with disfigured faces.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

WWI Diaries Of Poet Siegfried Sassoon Go Public For First Time

English poet and author Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967) wearing his army uniform. His experiences in the First World War resulted in his hatred of war, which he expressed in much of his work.
George C. Beresford Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 9:58 am

Nearly two dozen diaries and notebooks of Siegfried Sassoon — among a handful of prominent soldier-poets whose artistic sensibilities were forged in the trenches of World War I — are being published online for the first time by the Cambridge University Library.

Sassoon, who served in the British Army, was a "gifted diarist [who] ... kept a journal for most of his life," the library says.

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Military Memorials
10:42 am
Tue July 8, 2014

Medal Of Honor Portal Given Prominent Place Near Tobin Center

Visitors exploring the grounds near the soon-to-be-opened Tobin Performing Arts Center may have come across a new military memorial added last week.

The brainchild of former Mayor Phil Hardberger, the Medal of Honor River Portal was finally realized when officials unveiled the monument the day before Independence Day.

“You know, it really is unique,” said Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff. 

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Parallels
2:52 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

Nineteen-year-old Bosnian Serb Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed the heir to the Austro-Hungarian empire, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and his wife, Sophie, during a visit to Sarajevo on June 28, 1914. Depending on whom you ask, he's either a hero or a terrorist.
Historical Archives Sarajevo AP

Originally published on Wed September 3, 2014 3:26 pm

A hundred years ago Saturday, Gavrilo Princip shot the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. That event triggered World War I, charting the course for the 20th century. Today, the legacy of the Bosnian Serb nationalist remains the subject of intense debate — nowhere more than in Sarajevo itself.

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History
2:23 am
Fri June 27, 2014

A Century Ago In Sarajevo: A Plot, A Farce And A Fateful Shot

The Austro-Hungarian archduke and his wife, Sophie, board a car just prior to his assassination in Sarajevo.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 27, 2014 9:57 am

The shot that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary was fired a hundred years ago this weekend.

The assassination in Sarajevo, on June 28, 1914, triggered World War I and changed the course of the 20th century. The consequences of that act were devastating. But the beginning of the story sounds almost like a farce — complete with bad aim, botched poisoning and a wrong turn on the road.

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Code Switch
6:58 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

The Harlem Hellfighters: Fighting Racism In The Trenches Of WWI

The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel by Max Brooks, retells the story of the first African-American unit to fight in World War I.
Caanan White Courtesy of Broadway Books

The 369th Infantry Regiment served 191 days under enemy fire in Europe. They returned home one of the most decorated American units of World War I.

"The French called them the 'Men of Bronze' out of respect, and the Germans called them the 'Harlem Hellfighters' out of fear," explains Max Brooks, author of The Harlem Hellfighters, a new graphic novel about the first African-American infantry unit to fight in World War I.

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History
3:21 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Without World War I, A Slower U.S. Rise, No 'God Bless America'

Without World War I, the woman's suffrage movement might have been slower to gain traction.
Paul Thompson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 3:45 pm

This is part of an All Things Considered series that imagines a counterfactual history of World War I.

This summer marks 100 years since the start of World War I. Many argue that the conflict was inevitable — but what if it wasn't?

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Arts & Culture
2:45 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

ITC Exhibits Vital Role Of Native American "Code Talkers" In War

Toledo Cousins
Photo courtesy National Archives

The Institute of Texan Cultures is opening an exhibition called "Native Words, Native Warriors" on an obscure part of recent American history. In World War I and II, American forces needed to communicate secrets to one another. The problem was the enemy understood their language.

"The Germans were very good at English and also good at cryptography and breaking codes," said the exhibit’s curator, Dr. William Meadows.

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Arts & Culture
2:51 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

SA Public Library Showing Off A Time Capsule Of World War I Posters

Victory Liberty Loan
Harry Hertzberg

An exhibit with an unusual origin opens at the downtown Central Library next week. The exhibit's curator, Allison Hays Lane, explains.

"We have over 40 wonderful, original World War I posters and prints that were found in the basement of the Hertzberg Museum," Lane said.

Lane was asked how that surprise find must have made those finding it feel.

“Almost like King Tut’s Tomb. I mean it was just wonderful!" she said.

Lane speaks in excited and reverential terms about the artists whose works comprise the "Winds and Words of War" collection.

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