World War I

This week marks the centennial of U.S. entry into World War I, a conflict that shattered empires and cost millions of lives. On the American home front, it made this country less culturally German.

Today, when the question of loyalty of immigrants has again become contentious, what happened a century ago has special relevance. World War I inspired an outbreak of nativism and xenophobia that targeted German immigrants, Americans of German descent and even the German language.

April 6 marks 100 years since the U.S. Congress voted to declare war on Germany, entering World War I. The war took the lives of 17 million people worldwide. What's not as well-known is the role that animals played at a time when they were still critical to warfare.

Imagine you're a military officer in World War I. Armies have grown so large, you can no longer communicate just by the sound of your voice or the wave of your hand. You need to synchronize movements of troops and artillery, far and wide.

You need a wristwatch.

Courtesy

A World War I poster and print exhibit goes on display at the Bexar County Courthouse today.  The “Winds and Words of War” will be unveiled on the first floor of the Courthouse at 5 p.m.

The exhibit of 40 vintage posters comes from the San Antonio Public Library Texana Collection.  Curator Allison Hays Lane addressed commissioners court last week.

Russell Crowe might be best known for his Academy Award-nominated performances in “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Insider,” or his Academy Award-winning role in “The Gladiator.”

For his latest film, “The Water Diviner,” Crowe also takes the director’s chair. The movie tells the story of an Australian farmer, played by Crowe, who is searching for his sons – all believed to have been killed in the battle of Gallipoli in 1915.

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