KPAC Blog

The KPAC Blog features classical music news and analysis.  From a detailed look at Wagner's masterpiece "Parsifal," to an inside look at the Latin Grammys, the KPAC Blog features writings about some of the music played on air as well as other interviews and essays about classical music.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:41 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Seeing Music For What It Is

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 2:32 pm

Music is not sound art, even though musical ideas find natural expression in melody and harmony, timbre and rhythm. Music may be carried in sound, but only in the way that our applause at a concert is carried in sound. Applause is clapping; it is stomping and shouting. These are noisy, but they are not noise. They are not sound as a physicist might think of sound. Music is to sound as gesture is to mere movement. Physics is only part of the story.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:10 am
Fri August 23, 2013

Behind The Latest Round Of Bruised Feelings At The Minnesota Orchestra

The chairs are still empty in Minneapolis, but all sides in the Minnesota Orchestra dispute have been busy trying to snap up web domain names.
iStock

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 11:05 am

In Minneapolis right now, even small matters have the potential to escalate — fast. Take the latest flashpoint in the Minnesota Orchestra's ongoing tribulations, which in about 24 hours has flared up a lot of ire in the classical community.

About a week ago, a semi-professional musician, blogger and longtime fan of the Minnesota Orchestra named Emily Hogstad was talking with some fellow Minnesota fans about the possibility of organizing a dedicated group of music lovers who want to see an end to the longstanding labor disputes at the Minneapolis-based ensemble.

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KPAC Programming
3:18 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

The San Antonio Symphony On KPAC: A Brahms Festival

Johannes Brahms, in 1853

This weekend, KPAC begins a series of concert broadcasts featuring the entire Brahms Festival, as presented by the San Antonio Symphony at the Majestic Theater in February, 2013.  Hear four symphonies, four concertos, and a few Hungarian Dances for good measure over the next four weeks with your host, Ricardo Chavira.

TPR's John Clare spoke to the San Antonio Symphony's music director, Sebastian Lang-Lessing, about the concerts before the performances:

The broadcasts take place on Saturday nights at 7:00 on KPAC 88.3 FM and KTXI 90.1 FM in the Hill Country.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:01 pm
Tue August 20, 2013

Symphonic For The People: The Mid-Century American Symphony

Composer Marc Blitzstein (left) with Leonard Bernstein studying the score of a Blitzstein work during a 1947 recording session.
W. Eugene Smith Time & Life Pictures/Getty Image

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 6:28 am

Over the course of the 20th century, the symphony as a genre — originally an inheritance from Europe — increasingly became a transnational tradition, flowing across the Atlantic and back again.

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Classical Spotlight
11:40 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

Philip Glass, Searching South Of The Border

Orange Mountain Music

Among my fellow classical music fans, I’ve been a big defender of Philip Glass’s music over the years. I enjoy the way the composer plays with time and space in his music, the way each harmonic shift signifies a sea change in the structure of the piece. After a period of heavy experimentation in the 1970s, pushing the boundaries of concert music with “Music with Changing Parts” and his opera “Einstein on the Beach,” Glass refined his radical style, adding linear melodic lines to the musical building blocks that formed the basis of his minimalist language.

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Music Reviews
12:32 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Forgotten Quartet, Reissued And Reevaluated

A new collection of Brahms and Mozart recordings by the Stuyvesant Quartet from 1947 conveys a kind of inward grace.
Jay Shulman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:50 pm

A movie last year called A Late Quartet told the traumatic story of what happens when a famous string quartet has to change personnel. But, in fact, most string quartets — like symphony orchestras, only more conspicuously — continually change players, because players retire, or die, or get more lucrative offers.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:16 am
Thu August 15, 2013

An American Maverick Turns The Symphony On Its Head

Charles Ives, better known as an insurance executive in his time, wrote innovative symphonies incorporating American folk and hymn tunes.
Corbis

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:22 am

  • Jan Swafford Tells The Story of Composer Charles Ives And His Wife, Harmony

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San Antonio Symphony on KPAC
10:35 pm
Wed August 14, 2013

Mozart, Ravel Highlights Of Symphony Broadcast

Laion

This week's San Antonio Symphony broadcast features quintessentially American music by Aaron Copland, as well as the American influence on the French composer Maurice Ravel. Mozart's final symphony rounds out the program.

Aaron Copland's "Rodeo" helped put the composer on the map; its rustic rhythms were a hit in 1942, and later held up as the epitome of Americana when used in a popular ad campaign, "Beef: It's What's For Dinner."

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Classical Music
8:38 pm
Tue August 13, 2013

Why Are American Orchestras Afraid Of New Symphonies?

David Robertson, a passionate champion of new music, conducts the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra on tour in Berlin.
Dilip Vishwanat St. Louis Symphony

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:22 am

  • The American Symphony: Music And Ideas With David Robertson

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Deceptive Cadence
12:15 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Chris Thile Looks Back To Bach

Chris Thile's new album, Sonatas and Partitas, draws from material written by Johann Sebastian Bach in the early 1700s.
Brantley Gutierrez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 1:09 pm

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