This Week in the Civil War

The Schreiner University Department of History is honoring the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War with a series of short vignettes focusing on events from 1861 through 1865.  The Civil War was the most destructive conflict in American history, but it was also one of our most defining moments as a people and as a nation.  Let us know what you think about "This Week in the Civil War."  E-mail your comments to Dr. John Huddleston at jhuddles@schreiner.edu.

Airs:  Weekdays at 5:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 4:19 p.m. on KTXI and 4:49 a.m., 9:29 p.m. on KSTX.

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Week of Nov. 25 - Dec. 1
3:42 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 448

After meeting one week earlier with pro-Union Kentuckians and acknowledging that he “would rather die than take back a word of the Proclamation of Freedom” an ever increasingly depressed Abraham Lincoln on Monday, November 24, 1862 wrote his friend and fellow abolitionist Carl Schurz, admitting “I certainly know that if the war fails, the administration fails, and I will be blamed for it, whether I deserve it or not.”

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Week of Nov. 18 - Nov. 24
3:39 pm
Fri November 23, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 447

On Saturday, November 22, 1862, Federal General Edwin Sumner, no doubt conveying Burnside’s decision, informed the city government of Fredericksburg, Virginia that Union forces would not bombard Fredericksburg despite the ultimatum of the prior day “so long as no hostile demonstration is made from the town.”  That is to say, as long as Confederate forces occupying the city and surrounding hills did not fire on Union forces then Fredericksburg would not be harmed. 

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Week of Nov. 18 - Nov. 24
3:37 pm
Thu November 22, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 446

Friday, November 21, 1862, Union General Ambrose Burnside called upon the city government of Fredericksburg, Virginia to surrender or else risk bombardment.  Burnside gave civil authorities sixteen hours to  remove any *sick or wounded, women, children, and the aged. 

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Week of Nov. 18 - Nov. 24
3:34 pm
Wed November 21, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 445

Both sides continued to prepare for the next great confrontation in the eastern theatre of war, the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia.  On Thursday, November 20, 1862, General Robert E. Lee arrived at Fredericksburg, while General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s corps at Winchester was preparing to move toward Fredericksburg. 

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Week of Nov. 18 - Nov. 24
3:32 pm
Tue November 20, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 444

On Wednesday, November 19, 1862, Confederate forces of General James Longstreet assumed defensive positions on the heights above the city of Fredericksburg, Virginia.  On Marye’s Heights and several other hills which dominated the area, Longstreet immediately began to concentrate his artillery so as to defend Fredericksburg from a possible Union assault. 

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Week of Nov. 18 - Nov. 24
3:21 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 443

On Tuesday, November 18, 1862, Union General Edwin Sumner’s Right Grand Division of the restructured Army of the Potomac arrived at Falmouth on the bluffs across the Rappahannock* River from Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

A major conflict seemed inevitable as both Union and Confederate forces moved toward Fredericksburg.  In other news, President Jefferson Davis, after the hasty resignation of George Randolph, appointed Major General Gustavus W. Smith temporary Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America. 

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Week of Nov. 11 - Nov. 17
3:19 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 442

The appointment of Ambrose Burnside seemed to be a good choice.  He was handsome and, at six feet in height, big in build.  His large face was surrounded by heavy whiskers or “sideburns,” in a play on his name.  He seemed dashing and brave, and he was.  He also seemed to be very intelligent, but he was not.

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Week of Nov. 11 - Nov. 17
3:17 pm
Thu November 15, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 441

On Thursday, November 13, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln reluctantly charged Attorney General Edward Bates with enforcement of the Federal Confiscation Act.  

Congress in 1861 and 1862 passed laws permitting the Union government to seize all the real and personal property of anyone taking up arms against the government, anyone aiding the rebellion directly, or anyone offering aid or comfort to the rebellion.

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Week of Nov. 11 - Nov. 17
3:14 pm
Wed November 14, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 440

On Saturday, November 15, 1862, Confederate President Jefferson Davis accepted the resignation of his third Secretary of War, George W. Randolph.

Randolph abruptly submitted his resignation for the same reason as four other Confederate secretaries of war; he felt that Davis was too actively intervening in the operations of the war department.

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Week of Nov. 11 - Nov. 17
3:32 pm
Tue November 13, 2012

This Week in the Civil War - 439

On November 14, 1862, anxious to satisfy Lincoln, Army of the Potomac commander General Ambrose Burnside submitted a plan for driving on Richmond.

Burnside proposed reorganizing his command into three grand divisions: the Right Grand Division under General Edwin Sumner, the Center Grand Division under General Joseph Hooker, and the Left Grand Division under General William Franklin.

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