Young People Adapt To A Changing Life At The Texas-Mexico Border

Along the dry, rocky desert of El Paso, Texas, a brown fence stretches for miles. The fence marks the southern U.S. border that separates El Paso from its Mexican sister city, Juarez. Twenty-two-year-old Antonio Villaseñor-Baca was born and raised in El Paso. His hometown is part of a huge "borderplex," where three cities — El Paso, Texas; Las Cruces, N.M.; and Juarez, Mexico — converge. Villaseñor-Baca has an uncle in Juarez, and while growing up, his dad would take him back and forth over...

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Ken Piorkowski / Wikimedia Commons | http://bit.ly/2zXBhaP

Texas Matters: Transparency & Death Row — What's To Hide?

The Source is a daily, one-hour program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our guests and a citywide audience.

National News

Denied Asylum, But Terrified To Return Home

In May, Lourdes walked across the bridge from Mexico to El Paso, Texas, and requested asylum. The first step is an interview with an asylum officer. "I told him that I have the evidence on me," Lourdes said, through an interpreter. She told the asylum officer about the scar on her arm, and the four missing fingers on her left hand — all evidence, she says, of a brutal attack by a gang in her native Honduras. But the asylum officer rejected her claim. "I don't know what happened," Lourdes said...

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Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association is filing a federal lawsuit against the city over its “free speech areas” at city libraries. The union claims the city violated the First Amendment when it prevented union petitioners from entering the buildings.


Brian Kirkpatrick / Texas Public Radio

A campaign to rid San Antonio of drinking straws to protect wildlife and reduce littering is underway, according to a news release from the San Antonio Zoo.

The zoo and associations representing the local restaurant, hotel, and tourism industries are backing the campaign called, “Straws No Mas.”

“We hope that through this pledge campaign we can encourage more sustainable alternatives, or, upon request, only procedures for customers who want to use a plastic straw,” said Tim Morrow, CEO and executive director of San Antonio Zoo.

Along the dry, rocky desert of El Paso, Texas, a brown fence stretches for miles. The fence marks the southern U.S. border that separates El Paso from its Mexican sister city, Juarez.

Twenty-two-year-old Antonio Villaseñor-Baca was born and raised in El Paso. His hometown is part of a huge "borderplex," where three cities — El Paso, Texas; Las Cruces, N.M.; and Juarez, Mexico — converge. Villaseñor-Baca has an uncle in Juarez, and while growing up, his dad would take him back and forth over the border a lot.

To Villaseñor-Baca, Juarez doesn't seem like another country.

From Texas Standard:

In the 1920s, archaeologists dug up a trove of ancient artifacts near Clovis, New Mexico. What humans had known about their past was changed forever. These artifacts were the oldest man-made objects found on the Western Hemisphere, and the discovery led to a theory that the first humans to set foot in the Americas did so around about 13,000 years ago, and that they made and used tools like the ones found near Clovis.

Ken Piorkowski / Wikimedia Commons | http://bit.ly/2zXBhaP

This week on "Texas Matters," we look at the death penalty.

Texas has executed 553 prisoners since capital punishment resumed in 1976, which is more than any other state. Over 11 years, Michelle Lyons watched 278 men and women take their last breath at the hands of the state.

Lyons joins us to discuss her experiences witnessing executions first as a newspaper reporter and then working for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in the book, “Death Row: The Final Minutes.”


New York University Press

Laura E. Gómez is a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles.  Her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race” explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.

Gómez said when 19th century Americans started moving west, they encountered Mexican-Americans, which fell in between the existing racial class of black and white.


New York University Press

On Fronteras:

 

In 1848,  the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo brought to an end the Mexican-American war, which was started in 1846 over a territorial dispute in Texas. The treaty led to land that has become Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, California, Utah and Wyoming.

Laura E. Gómez, a professor of law at the UCLA School of Law in Los Angeles, joins us to discuss her book “Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican-American Race,” which explores how America’s newest citizens fit into the existing racial class after the war.


Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

From art exhibits to Hemingway to a play that's downright tornadic, there's plenty to do this weekend.


Ryan Loyd / TPR News

As the San Antonio Professional Firefighters Association continues its charge to amend the City charter, there are questions about their funding disclosures and potential campaign finance violations.

The Express-News reported on Tuesday that the union had failed to disclose payments made to the firm Texas Petition Strategies, as is required by state law.

For many people, retirement marks the end of one chapter and the start of another. This is especially true for active-duty personnel when they transition into civilian life.

When asked about her own transition out of the military, Robin Harder — a former Spanish and Russian linguist for the Army — explained that her experience was easier than she thought it would be, in part because she set herself up for success.

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Courtesy photo

How have The Four Freshmen managed to sound so young all these years? The voices come and go, but that beautiful four-part harmony remains the same.

“Well, we always like to use the analogy… it’s more like a sports team. The organization is the same, it’s just the players and the faces have changed throughout the years,” explains Bob Ferreira, the low (or 4th) voice in the group.

Jack Morgan / Texas Public Radio

From art exhibits to Hemingway to a play that's downright tornadic, there's plenty to do this weekend.


Nathan Cone / Texas Public Radio

Los Nahuatlatos (nä wät lâ tōs) is a group with deep roots to their Xicano-Indigenous heritage, whose mission is to “create original, inspiring and innovative music on a conscious level that people of all ages and backgrounds can enjoy.” They describe their sound as “Xicano roots fusion,” because their music is a combination of different traditional Latino styles.

 

Siggi Ragnar / Contributed Photo

A Broadway classic, a photo exhibit and chamber music — there is plenty to do this weekend.

 


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