Texas Standard

Weekdays, 10 a.m.

From fascinating innovations that reshape technology to shifting demographics that transform the nation, from political leaders to pop culture icons – what happens in Texas drives the American narrative. So why let New York, Washington and Los Angeles shape our sense of the world? 

Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering crisp, up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines.


The one-hour daily news magazine is grounded in the best traditions of American journalism: fact-based, independent and politically neutral reporting. In an era in which news outlets, politics and citizens are increasingly polarized, Texas Standard offers critical breadth, variety and integrity.


Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions.


Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States.

The Austin Police Department is the public face of the investigation into the four bombings in the city this month. But behind the scenes the APD is getting help from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the FBI.

Alain Stephens, an investigative reporter with the Texas Standard, has been speaking on background with some ATF officials. KUT's Nathan Bernier talked with Stephens about how the agency investigates bombings.

From Texas Standard:

The Rio Grande isn't as full as it used to be. And that's a problem for everyone who shares the river. Texas claims that New Mexico is keeping more than its fair share of the water. And it's actually suing that state and Colorado in a case that's gone to the Supreme Court.

But the Rio Grande doesn't just flow through the U.S. It also feeds Mexico. Officials on both sides of the border are concerned about water scarcity, and they are taking new measures to conserve the resource.

From Texas Standard:

The 2018 NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament tips off Friday. And the road to the championship may go through Texas. Although there are only three Lone Star State schools in the field of 64, you could make a strong case for each one’s title chances.

From Texas Standard.

A gas explosion in Dallas last month killed a 12-year old girl and brought new attention to an aging infrastructure. The natural gas supplier, Atmos Energy, says it’s upgrading old steel pipes in the area, but many wonder why it took a deadly explosion to draw attention to the issue in the first place.