Cancer Research

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More than 15,000 children and adolescents up to 19 years old will receive a cancer diagnosis this year, according to the National Cancer Institute

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The key to finding a better way to treat a deadly form of childhood cancer may lie in a tiny fish. An unlikely animal model at UT Health San Antonio is helping scientists figure out how to tackle muscle tumors.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Some San Antonio researchers are developing a new cancer treatment that may be less debilitating than chemo and other therapies. It could also be cheaper.

57-year-old Teresa Farris is fighting a particularly aggressive malignancy called triple negative breast cancer. It’s difficult to treat and it often comes back.

"I’m just continuing to fight on," Farris said. "Whatever it takes."

A group of researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have developed a way to deliver nanoparticle radiation directly to the brain tumor and keep it there. The method doses the tumor itself with much higher levels of radiation, twenty to thirty times the current dose of radiation therapy to patients, but spares a much greater area of brain tissue. 

A scientist's ambitious plan to create an early detection system for eye cancer using people's home cameras is coming along.