Ryan E. Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Finance Committee Completes Its Proposed Texas Budget

Budget writers in the Texas Senate have completed their version of the state’s two year budget. “This budget reflects the priorities of the entire Finance Committee and I hope when it passes the Texas Senate it reflects the priorities of the Texas Senate," says State Sen. Jane Nelson is the Chair of the Senate Finance Committee. Nelson says they were able to provide more money for Child Protective Services this session. But the plan also reduces state spending for public education funding,...

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The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

'The Alamo' At 50

Oct 15, 2010
MGM

"The Alamo" is celebrating a milestone. Fifty years ago this month, John Wayne's version of Texas' struggle for independence made its way to the big screen.  "The Alamo" was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won one Oscar, for Best Sound.  To celebrate its 50th anniversary, the caretakers of the Alamo, the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, organized a special screening of the film at San Antonio's IMAX Rivercenter Theater on Friday, October 8.  

Courtesy Photo

Going to the movies is a part of most of our lives. But for many families with special needs, heading out to see the latest blockbuster is not an option. 

In the movie business, bigger is better, and the local cineplex features an explosion of bewildering options designed to overwhelm the senses.  For most of us, that’s what makes the movies fun – but for others, it can be too much to take.

Vivian Edens is a San Antonio mom whose son, Hunter, has Asperger Syndrome, a disorder on the autism spectrum.

This is the Willie Nelson most of America knows: picking his old Martin guitar, accompanied by his ragtag band, rolling down the highway in a cloud of pot smoke. In other words, outlaw country music in person.

But the Willie Nelson I first became aware of in the early 1970s was someone else entirely -- a Nashville songwriter with a unique lyrical and musical gift.

Maria Callas defined what it meant to be a diva. And Callas remains one of the towering figures of opera. But, exciting as Callas was as a performer, her voice began to decline while she was still relatively young. Experts and fans alike continue to question what exactly happened to a voice that was both exhilarating and controversial.

The year was 1952, and Callas was performing what would become one of her legendary roles -- Bellini's Norma -- at London's Covent Garden.

Courtesy of the Criterion Collection.

"The Red Shoes," the rapturous 1948 British film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, is not just a great backstage film, it’s about the burning hunger that great artists have within them to create. In fact, "The Red Shoes" even goes as far as to suggest that art is something worth dying for.  In the freshly post-war England, this must have been a daring thematic choice.  After all, citizens for years had been dying for crown and country, and now, for dance?  But for the artists of "The Red Shoes," dance they must. 

© 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment.

Are we wake-walking through our dreams, or sleep-walking through life? Or is it the reverse?

Josh Huskin

Onstage at the South By Southwest festival in Austin last month, Girl in a Coma played to a packed house at a club on Sixth Street with a special guest, Cherie Currie, co-founder with Joan Jett of the iconic late seventies all-female band, The Runaways.  Girl in a Coma’s bassist Jenn Alva says it was a real “rock star” moment for her.

“I guess we really never think about ‘Oh, we’re so cool,’ but when we were the backup band for her, we just felt like, ‘YEAH!,” says Alva. 

Drummer Phanie Diaz, laughing, pipes in, “Yeah, Jenn’s lips naturally snarled!”

Nathan Cone

  

In the mid-1990s, Samuel “Sambo” Mockbee, founded the Rural Studio, a radical educational design/build program in poverty-stricken Hale County, Alabama. 

St. Chris Productions/Cinema Libre Studio

A sweet comedy about a sad sack poet trying to open a “mostly vegetarian” food stand, writer/director/actor Paul Gordon says "The Happy Poet" is also about "kindness and generosity versus looking out for yourself and doing what you need to do to get by." In the film, Bill (Gordon) finds trying to stay true to his convictions and make ends meet to be tougher than he expected.  

Nathan Cone

In 1957, Barbara Smith Conrad was studying music at the University of Texas in Austin. She was cast as Dido in a student production of Henry Purcell’s opera "Dido and Aeneas." 

Two weeks before the curtain, Conrad learned that she would not be singing the role of Dido, because a state congressman had objected to an African-American woman being cast opposite a white leading man in a romantic role.  

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7 Stories, 7 Dollars

April 4 at the Josephine Theatre!

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TPR Fiesta Medal Pick Up Party 2017

Join TPR Sunday, March 26 from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Crumpets Restaurant. Reserve your medal and a spot at the party!

Arts & Culture

Julia Wesely

An up-n-coming musical performance group is coming to the Alamo City.  They come from Bratislava, but now live in Vienna. Their style is really intense.

Jack Morgan

Downtown San Antonio can be overwhelmingly loud sometimes. Then you round a corner...and everything changes.

(Hit Listen to hear the musicians play. )

"Today we are celebrating Johann Sebastian Bach's birthday with Bach on the Plaza."

Violinist Aimee Lopez says it's part of the worldwide Bach in the Subway celebration, but since we don't have a subway,  about 15 San Antonio Symphony musicians and students played Monday morning on Main Plaza.

Bob Gleason and his friend Paul Reece had heard about it and walked over.

A Canadian musical troupe is coming to the Majestic Theatre to perform and the way they make their music is unusual.

Fred Junkin

  On March 10, 2017, Texas lost a legendary music educator and master band director, Fred H. Junkin. He began his teaching career in Teague, Texas before taking a position at Tyler Jr. High for the following three years, 1951-1954. His next professional move was to be his last. In 1954, he and his new bride, Don Beth, relocated to Victoria, Texas, where he led the Victoria High School band program for 31 years.

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