David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Early Voting Begins For Mayoral, Bond And Local Elections

Early voting for the May 6 local elections begins Monday across Texas. San Antonio voters will begin casting ballots for mayor, council members, and an $850 million bond election, the largest in city history. Many area communities are also electing local representatives; voting for school bonds; and deciding other municipal issues. The Alamo Community College District is asking voters to support a $450 million bond for new and improved facilities.

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The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.
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Editor’s Note: When I received a review copy of the new direct-to-video movie Santa Buddies in the mail, I knew exactly who to call. My own buddy Ryan, whom I’ve known since college, tolerates excruciatingly bad movies well, for what reason I cannot tell. I figured that reading his review of the movie would be much more fun than sitting through 88 minutes of CGI-assisted talking dogs. I wasn’t disappointed. Without further ado, here’s the longest analysis of Santa Buddies you’re likely to read on the Internet. Now, I dare you to watch the movie. –Nathan Cone 

Director Wes Anderson has worked on a lot of film projects, but with his latest picture, Fantastic Mr. Fox, he ventured into new territory. It's the first time Anderson has made an animated feature.

Based on the Roald Dahl children's book of the same name, Fantastic Mr. Fox is the story of a slick, well-bred fellow (voiced by George Clooney) who swears off stealing from three rich farmers after becoming a parent — but who can't entirely control his sticky fingers.

Zeitgeist Films

Seven-year-old Rowan Isaacson is like many kids his age.  He enjoys playing with toys, reading books, and spending time with friends and family.  But as the new documentary and book "The Horse Boy" illustrates, as little as two years ago, Rowan’s life was very different. 

Alfred A. Knopf, publisher

In December 2007, the "Mitchell Report," detailing the use of performance enhancing drugs by dozens of Major League Baseball players, was released. Roger Clemens was among the players listed in that report. The new book "American Icon: The Fall of Roger Clemens and the Rise of Steroids in America's Pastime" lays bare the corruption that has plagued baseball for years, and chronicles the downfall of Katy, Texas-native Clemens. 

Next week, Kelly Blair, a former gym owner from Pasadena, Texas, will testify before a federal grand jury that is believed to be investigating Clemens for perjury. Clemens testified under oath before a congressional committee in February, 2008 that he had never used steroids or human growth hormone. Nathaniel Vinton is one of four investigative writers from the New York Daily News that has been following this story.

MGM

Remember "The Alamo?" Fifty years ago, actor John Wayne and crew set up shop outside of Bracketville, Texas, to film an ambitious re-telling of the epic story of the Battle for Texas Independence.  "The Alamo" was nominated for seven Oscars, including Best Picture.  It won one award for its impressive sound design.   Although there have been subsequent films of the Alamo story, many people still hold John Wayne’s version close to their hearts.

Courtesy Photo

The first thing you notice when meeting the San Antonio trio Girl in a Coma in person is how tiny singer Nina Diaz seems. Walking down a hallway in the studios of Texas Public Radio, carrying an acoustic guitar sans case, she looks for all the world like a singer of wispy, confessional coffeehouse folk songs — a light green sweater covers the kaleidoscope of tattoos coloring both of her arms.

Terry And Gyan Riley: Together IN C

May 12, 2009

Legend has it that composer Terry Riley was sitting on a bus in San Francisco when the idea came to him for one of the most important and influential pieces of music of the last half of the 20th century.

Nathan Cone

Musicians find inspiration in the darndest places.  Take Charlie Roadman, of the Austin-based group F for Fake.  Ancient Greek conflicts are generally not high up on the list of things that songwriters write about, but Roadman, an admitted history buff, has been thinking about the Peloponnesian War for some time, ever since he first encountered Thucydides’ account of the war as an undergraduate at San Antonio’s Trinity University.  Now Roadman has a new musical project with his F for Fake band mates.

TexasAndroid / Wikimedia Commons

Despite an increase in awareness and services, the number of homeless veterans across the country remains high. While many programs try to give these vets a new life off the streets, some never make it back to stability. An effort by the military community strives to ensure the sacrifices these men have made will never be forgotten.

“I have spent more than 35 years of my professional life trying to find out who we are,” says filmmaker Ken Burns. His documentary, “The National Parks,” is a six-part series that traces the history and development of the National Parks System, from the moment the first white settlers laid eyes on Yosemite, to the acts of congress that created the parks. The film also tells the stories of those officials and citizens that help preserve the parks for future generations.

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Arts & Culture

Elias Gottlob Haussmann / Wikipedia Commons

“There just aren’t enough opportunities for people living in San Antonio to hear baroque music,” says Amy Pikler, a violist with the San Antonio Symphony, who also plays recorder. “Most classical concerts don’t even include one piece of baroque music. You don’t hear Bach and Telemann as often as you hear Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Brahms, and I think that people should know that [baroque music] is just as good in a different way. I really want people to hear it and I think that they deserve to hear it.”

Gift of Robert L. B. Tobin TL1999.263.1 / McNay

Make a date with KPAC and KTXI for the next eight Sunday afternoons for The Art of American Popular Song, the reprise of a series produced over a decade ago for KPAC by co-writers and hosts Kathy Couser and James Baker. Each week the program will focus on one of the most important of the songwriters who produced, over a span of 50 years, what is affectionately known as The Great American Songbook.

Jazz TX

If you’ve been to Jazz, TX, you know that while jazz is the main course at the club, you’ll also find healthy side helpings of blues on the menu.

In this episode of "Live At Jazz, TX," guitarist Ruben V brings his band to the club and shares the stage with San Antonio’s own Doc Watkins on the Hammond organ for a six-song set featuring smoking blues and Latin grooves.

Serkan Zanagar

Unusual music in an unusual place on Saturday. TPR's Arts and Culture Reporter Jack Morgan spoke to the group's leader.

Mark Landson says what makes Neo Camerata unusual is that it's classical, but with a twist.

"It brings it into a language that is more updated for today. A lot of times we hear pop harmonies. We hear various types of rhythms, rhythmic patterns that they didn't have available, back in the 19th century when those guys were writing."

"It's sort of like a melding of popular music of today with classical craft."

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