Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

When the opera Appomattox premiered in 2007, it put on stage a piece of history that was more than 140 years old.

But creators Philip Glass and Christopher Hampton recently decided the story wasn't over.

When the Washington National Opera wanted to stage the opera, Glass said it needed a rewrite — to reflect what's happened in the U.S. since the premiere.

"In the last seven or eight years there have been profound and really horrific changes in the way this country understands itself," Glass says.


In April 1964, the New York World’s Fair opened in Flushing Meadow, Queens, and promised “Peace Through Understanding.” Despite that noble slogan, it was a time of social upheaval, the dawning of what would be known as “The Sixties.” 

Throughout 2015 the world has been celebrating the 400th anniversary of the publication of Miguel de Cervantes novel, Don Quixote. We've also been celebrating on KPAC's weekly Classics a la Carte, focusing upon a variety of different musical tellings of the many adventures of Don Quixote and his sidekick, Sancho Panza.

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia. © Sucessio Miro / Artists Right Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2015

The curtain rises on Modernists at The McNay, Part Two with another perspective on the large canvas which greets visitors to the McNay's current headline show, Miro: The Experience of Seeing. Rene Barilleaux, Chief Curator at the McNay, describes what he sees in Miro's Homage to Picasso. We then follow Rene into the next room, coming face-to-face with Woman and Bird in the Night. The question raised here is whether by a simple charcoal inscription of the word "orange" the viewer will "see" a color which isn't really there.

Murali Subraman

Another cooler weekend is heading our way and we've found some fun things to do, rain, shine or a mix.